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Title: Significant Improvement in Silicon Chemical Vapor Deposition Epitaxy Above the Surface Dehydrogenation Temperature

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
897797
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 100; Journal Issue: 9, 2006; Related Information: Article No. 093520
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION; DEHYDROGENATION; EPITAXY; SILICON; SOLAR ENERGY; Solar Energy - Photovoltaics; Silicon Materials and Devices

Citation Formats

Wang, Q., Teplin, C. W., Stradins, P., To, B., Jones, K. M., and Branz, H. M. Significant Improvement in Silicon Chemical Vapor Deposition Epitaxy Above the Surface Dehydrogenation Temperature. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2363766.
Wang, Q., Teplin, C. W., Stradins, P., To, B., Jones, K. M., & Branz, H. M. Significant Improvement in Silicon Chemical Vapor Deposition Epitaxy Above the Surface Dehydrogenation Temperature. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2363766.
Wang, Q., Teplin, C. W., Stradins, P., To, B., Jones, K. M., and Branz, H. M. Sun . "Significant Improvement in Silicon Chemical Vapor Deposition Epitaxy Above the Surface Dehydrogenation Temperature". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2363766.
@article{osti_897797,
title = {Significant Improvement in Silicon Chemical Vapor Deposition Epitaxy Above the Surface Dehydrogenation Temperature},
author = {Wang, Q. and Teplin, C. W. and Stradins, P. and To, B. and Jones, K. M. and Branz, H. M.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2363766},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 9, 2006,
volume = 100,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • No abstract prepared.
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