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Title: National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program Report to Congress: An Integrated Assessment

Abstract

Under Title IX of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, Congress reauthorized the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) to continue coordinating acid rain research and monitoring, as it had done during the previous decade, and to provide Congress with periodic reports. In particular, Congress asked NAPAP to assess all available data and information to answer two questions: (1) What are the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of Title IV? This question addresses the costs and economic impacts of complying with the Acid Rain Program as well as benefit analyses associated with the various human health and welfare effects, including reduced visibility, damages to materials and cultural resources, and effects on ecosystems. (2) What reductions in deposition rates are needed to prevent adverse ecological effects? This complex questions addresses ecological systems and the deposition levels at which they experience harmful effects. The results of the assessment of the effects of Title IV and of the relationship between acid deposition rates and ecological effects were to be reported to Congress quadrennially, beginning with the 1996 report to Congress. The objective of this Report is to address the two main questions posed by Congress and fully communicate the results of the assessment tomore » decision-makers. Given the primary audience, most of this report is not written as a technical document, although information supporting the conclusions is provided along with references.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOC/NOAA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Energy Research (ER)
OSTI Identifier:
876498
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/62639-1
TRN: US200712%%174
DOE Contract Number:  
AI02-98ER62639
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ACID RAIN; CLEAN AIR ACTS; CULTURAL RESOURCES; DEPOSITION; ECONOMIC IMPACT; ECOSYSTEMS; MONITORING; US NAPAP; VISIBILITY; Acid Precipitation, Clean Air Act

Citation Formats

Uhart, M., and et al,. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program Report to Congress: An Integrated Assessment. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/876498.
Uhart, M., & et al,. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program Report to Congress: An Integrated Assessment. United States. doi:10.2172/876498.
Uhart, M., and et al,. Mon . "National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program Report to Congress: An Integrated Assessment". United States. doi:10.2172/876498. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/876498.
@article{osti_876498,
title = {National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program Report to Congress: An Integrated Assessment},
author = {Uhart, M. and et al,},
abstractNote = {Under Title IX of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, Congress reauthorized the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) to continue coordinating acid rain research and monitoring, as it had done during the previous decade, and to provide Congress with periodic reports. In particular, Congress asked NAPAP to assess all available data and information to answer two questions: (1) What are the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of Title IV? This question addresses the costs and economic impacts of complying with the Acid Rain Program as well as benefit analyses associated with the various human health and welfare effects, including reduced visibility, damages to materials and cultural resources, and effects on ecosystems. (2) What reductions in deposition rates are needed to prevent adverse ecological effects? This complex questions addresses ecological systems and the deposition levels at which they experience harmful effects. The results of the assessment of the effects of Title IV and of the relationship between acid deposition rates and ecological effects were to be reported to Congress quadrennially, beginning with the 1996 report to Congress. The objective of this Report is to address the two main questions posed by Congress and fully communicate the results of the assessment to decision-makers. Given the primary audience, most of this report is not written as a technical document, although information supporting the conclusions is provided along with references.},
doi = {10.2172/876498},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2005},
month = {8}
}