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Title: Energy use for building construction. Final report, March 1, 1976--December 31, 1976

Abstract

Total (direct and indirect) energy requirements of the construction industry for 1967 were determined in order to examine the potential for energy savings. The Energy Input/Output Model developed at the Center for Advanced Computation, University of Illinois, was expanded to include 49 building and non-building construction sectors (new and maintenance). Total energy intensities were determined for these sectors, as well as energy requirements to final demand. Overall, the construction industry required about 6000 trillion Btu, or about 9% of the total U. S. energy requirement in 1967. About 20% of this requirement was for direct energy. Energy requirements were further broken down according to goods and services purchased by individual construction sectors, and energy distribution patterns were determined within each construction sector. Energy cost per unit for various building materials were calculated, as well as 1967 energy cost per square foot for building sectors. Laboratories required the most energy per square foot (2,074,056 Btu/SF), while Farm Service required the least (149,071 Btu/SF). Comparative interchangeable building assemblies were evaluated for their energy costs, including initial construction and lifetime maintenance energy. Tradeoffs between construction and operational energy costs were determined for a selected wall frame assembly with different exterior finishes and varyingmore » degrees of insulation. A study was initiated to determine industries in which direct energy use led to a significant amount of the energy embodied in New Building Construction for 1967. The resulting Energy Flow Chart is included.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Illinois Univ., Urbana (USA). Center for Advanced Computation; Stein (Richard G.) and Associates, Architects, New York (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA)
OSTI Identifier:
7301380
Report Number(s):
COO-2791-3
DOE Contract Number:
EY-76-S-02-2791
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; BUILDINGS; CONSTRUCTION; CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; BUILDING MATERIALS; ECONOMICS; ENERGY CONSERVATION; ENERGY DEMAND; PIPELINES; PRODUCTION; RAILWAYS; ROADS; INDUSTRY; MATERIALS; 320300* - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Industrial & Agricultural Processes

Citation Formats

Hannon, B M, Stein, R G, Segal, B, Serber, D, and Stein, C. Energy use for building construction. Final report, March 1, 1976--December 31, 1976. United States: N. p., 1976. Web. doi:10.2172/7301380.
Hannon, B M, Stein, R G, Segal, B, Serber, D, & Stein, C. Energy use for building construction. Final report, March 1, 1976--December 31, 1976. United States. doi:10.2172/7301380.
Hannon, B M, Stein, R G, Segal, B, Serber, D, and Stein, C. 1976. "Energy use for building construction. Final report, March 1, 1976--December 31, 1976". United States. doi:10.2172/7301380. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/7301380.
@article{osti_7301380,
title = {Energy use for building construction. Final report, March 1, 1976--December 31, 1976},
author = {Hannon, B M and Stein, R G and Segal, B and Serber, D and Stein, C},
abstractNote = {Total (direct and indirect) energy requirements of the construction industry for 1967 were determined in order to examine the potential for energy savings. The Energy Input/Output Model developed at the Center for Advanced Computation, University of Illinois, was expanded to include 49 building and non-building construction sectors (new and maintenance). Total energy intensities were determined for these sectors, as well as energy requirements to final demand. Overall, the construction industry required about 6000 trillion Btu, or about 9% of the total U. S. energy requirement in 1967. About 20% of this requirement was for direct energy. Energy requirements were further broken down according to goods and services purchased by individual construction sectors, and energy distribution patterns were determined within each construction sector. Energy cost per unit for various building materials were calculated, as well as 1967 energy cost per square foot for building sectors. Laboratories required the most energy per square foot (2,074,056 Btu/SF), while Farm Service required the least (149,071 Btu/SF). Comparative interchangeable building assemblies were evaluated for their energy costs, including initial construction and lifetime maintenance energy. Tradeoffs between construction and operational energy costs were determined for a selected wall frame assembly with different exterior finishes and varying degrees of insulation. A study was initiated to determine industries in which direct energy use led to a significant amount of the energy embodied in New Building Construction for 1967. The resulting Energy Flow Chart is included.},
doi = {10.2172/7301380},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1976,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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  • Total (direct and indirect) energy requirements of the construction industry for 1967 were determined in order to examine the potential for energy savings. The Energy Input/Output Model developed at the Center for Advanced Computation, University of Illinois, was expanded to include a detailed breakdown of the industry and energy intensities of 49 building construction (new and maintenance) sectors and of the overall building construction industry were determined for 1967. The latter figure was computed at about 70,000 Btu/$, i.e., the construction industry on the average required about 70,000 Btu of direct and indirect energy per dollar of output produced. Inmore » addition, total energy requirements to final demand were developed for the construction industry for 1967. The overall industry required about 6000 trillion Btu, or about nine percent of the total U.S. energy requirement. Energy requirements were further broken down according to goods and services purchased by individual construction sectors, and energy distribution patterns were determined. Energy cost per unit for several input materials to construction were calculated, as well as energy cost per square foot for various building sectors in 1967. Laboratories and hospitals required the most energy per square foot (2,073,755 Btu/ft/sup 2/ and 1,722,172 Btu/ft/sup 2/, respectively), while warehouses required the least (558,403 Btu/ft/sup 2/). Finally, a prototypical study was conducted to determine industries in which direct energy use led to a significant amount of energy embodied in new construction for 1967. The resulting energy flow chart is included.« less
  • The building construction industry, as broken down by the Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Department of Commerce, was integrated into the Energy Input/Output Model developed at the Center for Advanced Computation, University of Illinois. The resulting expanded model was used to determine energy intensities of various (49) building construction (new and maintenance) sectors and of the overall building construction industry, for year 1967. The latter figure was computed at about 70,000 Btu/$, i.e., the construction industry on the average required about 70,000 Btu of direct and indirect energy per dollar of output produced. The most energy intensive sector was Newmore » Construction of Petroleum Pipelines (about 150,000 Btu/$), while the least intensive was Maintenance Construction for Electric Utilities (about 25,000 Btu/$). Also developed were total energy (direct and indirect) requirements to final demand for the building construction industry, for 1967. The overall industry required about 6000 trillion Btu, or about nine percent of the total U.S. energy requirement. New Highway Construction required the most energy to final demand (about 1000 trillion Btu, or 16 percent of the total construction industry requirement), while Maintenance Construction Residential required the least (about 9 trillion Btu, or 0.1 percent of the total industry requirement.« less
  • The cost status for each task is tabulated and the cumulative cost and estimated cost spending curve is shown.
  • This report covers the H-Coal Pilot Plant facility located in Catlettsburg, Kentucky. The authorization for this project was under DOE contract No. DE-AC05-78ET11052, formally ET-78-C-01-3224. Badger Plants, Inc. carried out the construction management of this facility. The estimated total cost is $147,265,013. A brief process/technical description of the Pilot Plant covers subjects such as objectives, capacity, expected life, etc. A brief technical description of each processing unit, including its purpose in the overall operations of the plant is given. A general description of the organizational history of the project is given. Current overall organization and a description of the responsibilitiesmore » of each participant are included. Badger Plant's organization at manager level is shown.« less
  • The objectives of the project are to develop a model energy conservation code based on ASHRAE 90-75; develop training material and conduct prototype courses; and recommend and demonstrate new systems to update codes and accept construction innovations. The program, divided into four phases, contains several tasks under each phase. Details of Task I are presented. The tasks summarized in this report for Phase I are: development of program plan; awarding of subcontracts; forming a Technical Council; reviewing available standards and regulations; developing preliminary model energy conservation code; developing education program outline and deployment plan; and reviewing current procedures for updatingmore » codes and accepting construction innovations. (MCW)« less