skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Energy use for building construction. Preliminary progress report for period March 1, 1976--May 15, 1976. [Energy intensities of various sectors and overall industry from Energy Input/Output Model]

Abstract

The building construction industry, as broken down by the Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Department of Commerce, was integrated into the Energy Input/Output Model developed at the Center for Advanced Computation, University of Illinois. The resulting expanded model was used to determine energy intensities of various (49) building construction (new and maintenance) sectors and of the overall building construction industry, for year 1967. The latter figure was computed at about 70,000 Btu/$, i.e., the construction industry on the average required about 70,000 Btu of direct and indirect energy per dollar of output produced. The most energy intensive sector was New Construction of Petroleum Pipelines (about 150,000 Btu/$), while the least intensive was Maintenance Construction for Electric Utilities (about 25,000 Btu/$). Also developed were total energy (direct and indirect) requirements to final demand for the building construction industry, for 1967. The overall industry required about 6000 trillion Btu, or about nine percent of the total U.S. energy requirement. New Highway Construction required the most energy to final demand (about 1000 trillion Btu, or 16 percent of the total construction industry requirement), while Maintenance Construction Residential required the least (about 9 trillion Btu, or 0.1 percent of the total industry requirement.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Illinois Univ., Urbana (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA)
OSTI Identifier:
7345825
Report Number(s):
COO-2791-1
DOE Contract Number:  
E(11-1)-2791
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; BUILDING MATERIALS; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; BUILDINGS; CONSTRUCTION; ENERGY MODELS; HOUSES; DEMAND FACTORS; ECONOMICS; MAINTENANCE; SIMULATION; MATERIALS; RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS; 298000* - Energy Planning & Policy- Consumption & Utilization; 320100 - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Buildings

Citation Formats

Hannon, B M, Stein, R G, Segal, B, and Serber, D. Energy use for building construction. Preliminary progress report for period March 1, 1976--May 15, 1976. [Energy intensities of various sectors and overall industry from Energy Input/Output Model]. United States: N. p., 1976. Web. doi:10.2172/7345825.
Hannon, B M, Stein, R G, Segal, B, & Serber, D. Energy use for building construction. Preliminary progress report for period March 1, 1976--May 15, 1976. [Energy intensities of various sectors and overall industry from Energy Input/Output Model]. United States. doi:10.2172/7345825.
Hannon, B M, Stein, R G, Segal, B, and Serber, D. Sat . "Energy use for building construction. Preliminary progress report for period March 1, 1976--May 15, 1976. [Energy intensities of various sectors and overall industry from Energy Input/Output Model]". United States. doi:10.2172/7345825. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/7345825.
@article{osti_7345825,
title = {Energy use for building construction. Preliminary progress report for period March 1, 1976--May 15, 1976. [Energy intensities of various sectors and overall industry from Energy Input/Output Model]},
author = {Hannon, B M and Stein, R G and Segal, B and Serber, D},
abstractNote = {The building construction industry, as broken down by the Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Department of Commerce, was integrated into the Energy Input/Output Model developed at the Center for Advanced Computation, University of Illinois. The resulting expanded model was used to determine energy intensities of various (49) building construction (new and maintenance) sectors and of the overall building construction industry, for year 1967. The latter figure was computed at about 70,000 Btu/$, i.e., the construction industry on the average required about 70,000 Btu of direct and indirect energy per dollar of output produced. The most energy intensive sector was New Construction of Petroleum Pipelines (about 150,000 Btu/$), while the least intensive was Maintenance Construction for Electric Utilities (about 25,000 Btu/$). Also developed were total energy (direct and indirect) requirements to final demand for the building construction industry, for 1967. The overall industry required about 6000 trillion Btu, or about nine percent of the total U.S. energy requirement. New Highway Construction required the most energy to final demand (about 1000 trillion Btu, or 16 percent of the total construction industry requirement), while Maintenance Construction Residential required the least (about 9 trillion Btu, or 0.1 percent of the total industry requirement.},
doi = {10.2172/7345825},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1976},
month = {5}
}