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Title: Nuclear proliferation: motivations, capabilities, and strategies for control

Abstract

Two possible patterns of proliferation appear to involve the greatest risks for nuclear use or war. The first is proliferation to particular categories of states and the second dangerous possibility is proliferation at a rapid rate. But rapid proliferation could cause instabilities that might be too great for political systems and institutions to handle, making nuclear use of nuclear war more likely. Thus, any strategy for nonproliferation should especially attempt to prevent a rapid spread of nuclear weapons and to avert acquisition by states in the high-risk categories. Nuclear proliferation will also have important effects on world and regional stability for reasons not directly related to nuclear use. The mere possession of nuclear weapons by certain states could radically alter international perceptions and threaten global arrangements. The main concern in this discussion is to analyze the various incentives and disincentives--involving both security and political considerations--that will affect states' decisions about whether or not to acquire nuclear weapons. The discussion then turns to the means by which individual states and the international community can influence nuclear incentives and disincentives. The particularly important subject of the management of the international nuclear industry is addressed separately, followed by an analysis of nuclear acquisition,more » use, and threat by non-state entities. Finally, a general strategy for decreasing incentives and increasing disincentives is proposed and applied to four special categories of states. (MCW)« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7286490
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; PROLIFERATION; CONTROL; GLOBAL ASPECTS; INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS; MARKET; NUCLEAR ENERGY; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; SECURITY; AGREEMENTS; ENERGY; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; POWER PLANTS; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; WEAPONS; 290600* - Energy Planning & Policy- Nuclear Energy; 450202 - Explosions & Explosives- Nuclear- Weaponry- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Greenwood, T., Feiveson, H.A., and Taylor, T.B. Nuclear proliferation: motivations, capabilities, and strategies for control. United States: N. p., 1977. Web.
Greenwood, T., Feiveson, H.A., & Taylor, T.B. Nuclear proliferation: motivations, capabilities, and strategies for control. United States.
Greenwood, T., Feiveson, H.A., and Taylor, T.B. Sat . "Nuclear proliferation: motivations, capabilities, and strategies for control". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7286490,
title = {Nuclear proliferation: motivations, capabilities, and strategies for control},
author = {Greenwood, T. and Feiveson, H.A. and Taylor, T.B.},
abstractNote = {Two possible patterns of proliferation appear to involve the greatest risks for nuclear use or war. The first is proliferation to particular categories of states and the second dangerous possibility is proliferation at a rapid rate. But rapid proliferation could cause instabilities that might be too great for political systems and institutions to handle, making nuclear use of nuclear war more likely. Thus, any strategy for nonproliferation should especially attempt to prevent a rapid spread of nuclear weapons and to avert acquisition by states in the high-risk categories. Nuclear proliferation will also have important effects on world and regional stability for reasons not directly related to nuclear use. The mere possession of nuclear weapons by certain states could radically alter international perceptions and threaten global arrangements. The main concern in this discussion is to analyze the various incentives and disincentives--involving both security and political considerations--that will affect states' decisions about whether or not to acquire nuclear weapons. The discussion then turns to the means by which individual states and the international community can influence nuclear incentives and disincentives. The particularly important subject of the management of the international nuclear industry is addressed separately, followed by an analysis of nuclear acquisition, use, and threat by non-state entities. Finally, a general strategy for decreasing incentives and increasing disincentives is proposed and applied to four special categories of states. (MCW)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1977},
month = {Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1977}
}

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