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Title: Energy and protein content of coyote prey in southeastern Idaho

Abstract

Gross energy, digestible energy, crude protein, and digestible crude protein were estimated for two leporids and five rodents that were the primary prey of coyotes (Canis latrans) in southeastern Idaho. Digestible protein estimates differed (38%-54%) more than digestible energy (3.5-4.4 kcal), in the prey examined. 15 references, 1 table.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins
OSTI Identifier:
7067086
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Great Basin Nat.; (United States); Journal Volume: 46:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; COYOTES; PREDATOR-PREY INTERACTIONS; RABBITS; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; RODENTS; FOOD CHAINS; IDAHO; PROTEINS; ANIMALS; FEDERAL REGION X; MAMMALS; NORTH AMERICA; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; USA; VERTEBRATES 510100* -- Environment, Terrestrial-- Basic Studies-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

MacCracken, J.G., and Hansen, R.M. Energy and protein content of coyote prey in southeastern Idaho. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
MacCracken, J.G., & Hansen, R.M. Energy and protein content of coyote prey in southeastern Idaho. United States.
MacCracken, J.G., and Hansen, R.M. 1986. "Energy and protein content of coyote prey in southeastern Idaho". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7067086,
title = {Energy and protein content of coyote prey in southeastern Idaho},
author = {MacCracken, J.G. and Hansen, R.M.},
abstractNote = {Gross energy, digestible energy, crude protein, and digestible crude protein were estimated for two leporids and five rodents that were the primary prey of coyotes (Canis latrans) in southeastern Idaho. Digestible protein estimates differed (38%-54%) more than digestible energy (3.5-4.4 kcal), in the prey examined. 15 references, 1 table.},
doi = {},
journal = {Great Basin Nat.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 46:2,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 4
}
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