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Title: Heat pump associations, alliances, and allies

Abstract

Associations, Alliances, and Allies, a seminar and workshop sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute, was held in Memphis, Tennessee, April 10--11, 1991. The focus of the meeting was relationships forged between electric utilities and trade allies that sell residential heat pumps. one hundred and seven representatives of electric utilities, dealer/contractors, manufacturers, and consultants attended. Electric utility trade ally programs run the gamut from coop advertising to heat pump association to elaborate technician training programs. All utility participants recognize the important programs, since it is the trade ally who sells, installs, and services heat pumps, while it is the electric utility who gets blamed if the heat pumps fail to operate properly or are inefficient. Heat pumps are efficient and effective, but their efficiency and effectiveness depends critically upon the quality of installation and maintenance. A utility can thus help to ensure satisfied customers and can also help to achieve its own load shape objectives by working closely with its trade allies, the dealers, contractors, manufacturers, and distributors. Attendees spent the morning sessions of the two day meeting in plenary sessions, hearing about utility and dealer heat pump programs and issues. Afternoon roundtable discussions provided structured forums to discuss: Advertising;more » Heat pump association startup and operation; Rebates and incentives; Technician training school and centers; Installation inspection and dealer qualification; and Heat pump association training. These proceedings report on the papers presented in the morning plenary sessions and summarize the main points discussed in the afternoon workshops.« less

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Policy Research Associates, Inc., Reston, VA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
EPRI; Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
7020658
Report Number(s):
EPRI-TR-101157; CONF-9104395--
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Heat pump associations, alliances, and allies, Memphis, TN (United States), 10-11 Apr 1991
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; HEAT PUMPS; MARKETING; ADVERTISING; BUILDINGS; ELECTRIC UTILITIES; INSTALLATION; MARKETING RESEARCH; PLANNING; PROCEEDINGS; DOCUMENT TYPES; PUBLIC UTILITIES 320106* -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- Building Equipment-- (1987-); 291000 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Conservation

Citation Formats

Not Available. Heat pump associations, alliances, and allies. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Not Available. Heat pump associations, alliances, and allies. United States.
Not Available. 1992. "Heat pump associations, alliances, and allies". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7020658,
title = {Heat pump associations, alliances, and allies},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {Associations, Alliances, and Allies, a seminar and workshop sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute, was held in Memphis, Tennessee, April 10--11, 1991. The focus of the meeting was relationships forged between electric utilities and trade allies that sell residential heat pumps. one hundred and seven representatives of electric utilities, dealer/contractors, manufacturers, and consultants attended. Electric utility trade ally programs run the gamut from coop advertising to heat pump association to elaborate technician training programs. All utility participants recognize the important programs, since it is the trade ally who sells, installs, and services heat pumps, while it is the electric utility who gets blamed if the heat pumps fail to operate properly or are inefficient. Heat pumps are efficient and effective, but their efficiency and effectiveness depends critically upon the quality of installation and maintenance. A utility can thus help to ensure satisfied customers and can also help to achieve its own load shape objectives by working closely with its trade allies, the dealers, contractors, manufacturers, and distributors. Attendees spent the morning sessions of the two day meeting in plenary sessions, hearing about utility and dealer heat pump programs and issues. Afternoon roundtable discussions provided structured forums to discuss: Advertising; Heat pump association startup and operation; Rebates and incentives; Technician training school and centers; Installation inspection and dealer qualification; and Heat pump association training. These proceedings report on the papers presented in the morning plenary sessions and summarize the main points discussed in the afternoon workshops.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1992,
month = 9
}

Conference:
Other availability
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