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Title: Health hazard evaluation report HETA 98-0152-2729, Wolfeboro Public Safety Building, Wolfeboro, New Hampshire

Abstract

On March 17, 1998, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a Health Hazard Evaluation request (HHE) from the New Hampshire Department of Labor to conduct an evaluation of diesel exhaust exposure at the Wolfeboro Public Safety Building, in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire. The request indicated that Fire and Police personnel were exposed to diesel exhaust from fire apparatus. Asthmatic bronchitis was listed as a health problem resulting from this exposure. On June 23, 1998, NIOSH investigators, accompanied by an industrial hygienist from the New Hampshire Bureau of Health Risk Assessment, conducted an industrial hygiene evaluation at the Wolfeboro Public Safety Building.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Div. of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations and Field Studies, Cincinnati, OH (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
698695
Report Number(s):
PB-99-167785/XAB; HETA-98-0152-2729
TRN: 92701903
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Mar 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; NITROGEN DIOXIDE; EXHAUST GASES; INDOOR AIR POLLUTION; OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; DIESEL ENGINES; HEALTH HAZARDS; PUBLIC BUILDINGS; NEW HAMPSHIRE

Citation Formats

Sylvain, D., and Echt, A. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 98-0152-2729, Wolfeboro Public Safety Building, Wolfeboro, New Hampshire. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Sylvain, D., & Echt, A. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 98-0152-2729, Wolfeboro Public Safety Building, Wolfeboro, New Hampshire. United States.
Sylvain, D., and Echt, A. Mon . "Health hazard evaluation report HETA 98-0152-2729, Wolfeboro Public Safety Building, Wolfeboro, New Hampshire". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_698695,
title = {Health hazard evaluation report HETA 98-0152-2729, Wolfeboro Public Safety Building, Wolfeboro, New Hampshire},
author = {Sylvain, D. and Echt, A.},
abstractNote = {On March 17, 1998, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a Health Hazard Evaluation request (HHE) from the New Hampshire Department of Labor to conduct an evaluation of diesel exhaust exposure at the Wolfeboro Public Safety Building, in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire. The request indicated that Fire and Police personnel were exposed to diesel exhaust from fire apparatus. Asthmatic bronchitis was listed as a health problem resulting from this exposure. On June 23, 1998, NIOSH investigators, accompanied by an industrial hygienist from the New Hampshire Bureau of Health Risk Assessment, conducted an industrial hygiene evaluation at the Wolfeboro Public Safety Building.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1999},
month = {Mon Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1999}
}

Technical Report:
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