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Title: Health hazard evaluation report HETA 90-168-2248, Independence Police Department Indoor Range, Independence, Missouri

Abstract

On February 14, 1990, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request from a management representative of the Independence, Missouri, Police Department Headquarters for a Health Hazard Evaluation. The Police Department requested NIOSH to evaluate the effectiveness of a newly redesigned air handling system installed inside their indoor firing range. On August 6, 1991, NIOSH investigators met with the firing range supervisor and toured the facility. On August 8, ten personal breathing-zone (PBZ) air samples and 3 area air samples were collected on filters inside the range and the filters were subsequently analyzed for lead by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Surface lead contamination inside the firing range was measured in two locations and hand (dermal) lead contamination was measured on two instructors and two field officers. These samples were also analyzed for lead by AAS.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
6241331
Report Number(s):
PB-93-182095/XAB; HETA--90-168-2248
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; HEALTH HAZARDS; RISK ASSESSMENT; INDOOR AIR POLLUTION; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; ANATOMY; BUILDINGS; CONTAMINATION; ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING; FILTERS; INHALATION; LEAD; MANAGEMENT; MISSOURI; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY; SAFETY; SAMPLING; SKIN; SPECTROSCOPY; STATISTICAL DATA; SURVEYS; TOXIC MATERIALS; TOXICITY; US NIOSH; VENTILATION; AIR POLLUTION; BIOLOGY; BODY; DATA; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; ELEMENTS; ENGINEERING; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; HAZARDS; INFORMATION; INTAKE; MATERIALS; METALS; MONITORING; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; NORTH AMERICA; NUMERICAL DATA; ORGANS; POLLUTION; US ORGANIZATIONS; USA 540150* -- Environment, Atmospheric-- Site Resources & Use Studies-- (1990-); 320107 -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- Building Systems-- (1987-)

Citation Formats

Rinehart, R.D., Almaguer, D., Klein, M.K., and Crouch, K.G. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 90-168-2248, Independence Police Department Indoor Range, Independence, Missouri. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Rinehart, R.D., Almaguer, D., Klein, M.K., & Crouch, K.G. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 90-168-2248, Independence Police Department Indoor Range, Independence, Missouri. United States.
Rinehart, R.D., Almaguer, D., Klein, M.K., and Crouch, K.G. 1992. "Health hazard evaluation report HETA 90-168-2248, Independence Police Department Indoor Range, Independence, Missouri". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6241331,
title = {Health hazard evaluation report HETA 90-168-2248, Independence Police Department Indoor Range, Independence, Missouri},
author = {Rinehart, R.D. and Almaguer, D. and Klein, M.K. and Crouch, K.G.},
abstractNote = {On February 14, 1990, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request from a management representative of the Independence, Missouri, Police Department Headquarters for a Health Hazard Evaluation. The Police Department requested NIOSH to evaluate the effectiveness of a newly redesigned air handling system installed inside their indoor firing range. On August 6, 1991, NIOSH investigators met with the firing range supervisor and toured the facility. On August 8, ten personal breathing-zone (PBZ) air samples and 3 area air samples were collected on filters inside the range and the filters were subsequently analyzed for lead by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Surface lead contamination inside the firing range was measured in two locations and hand (dermal) lead contamination was measured on two instructors and two field officers. These samples were also analyzed for lead by AAS.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1992,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:
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