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Title: An overview of microalgae industrial phycology

Abstract

Microalgae, Chlorella, production for health foods has been an established industry in the Far East for over twenty five years. Since the mid-1970's, commercial Spirulina production has been carried out, first in Mexico, and since then by several companies, including two located in the United States. Spirulina is sold not only in the health food trade, but is also used in the extraction of food coloring agents and aquaculture feeds. Since the early 1980's, Dunaliella has been produced in the US, Australia, and Israel for its beta-carotene content. Microalgae are also being produced at a small scale for aquaculture feeds and several companies are developing processes for the controlled cultivation of microalgae in bioreactors for speciality products, including essential fatty acids, pigments, diagnostic reagents, etc. The commercial applications of microalgae extend to wastewater treatment, including heavy metals removal. The steady progress of microalgae industrial phycology promises to continue in the coming years and decades.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6944206
Report Number(s):
CONF-9208211-
Journal ID: ISSN 0022-3646; CODEN: JPYLAJ; TRN: 93-006849
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Phycology; (United States); Journal Volume: 28:3; Conference: 1992 meeting of the Phycological Society of America, Honolulu, HI (United States), 9-13 Aug 1992
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ALGAE; CULTIVATION; USES; CHLORELLA; AQUACULTURE; BIOREACTORS; FOOD; INDUSTRY; METALS; PIGMENTS; WASTE PROCESSING; CHLOROPHYCOTA; ELEMENTS; MANAGEMENT; MICROORGANISMS; PLANTS; PROCESSING; UNICELLULAR ALGAE; WASTE MANAGEMENT; 553006* - Agriculture & Food Technology- Other Agricultural Applications- (1987-); 320300 - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Industrial & Agricultural Processes

Citation Formats

Benemann, J.R. An overview of microalgae industrial phycology. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Benemann, J.R. An overview of microalgae industrial phycology. United States.
Benemann, J.R. Wed . "An overview of microalgae industrial phycology". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6944206,
title = {An overview of microalgae industrial phycology},
author = {Benemann, J.R.},
abstractNote = {Microalgae, Chlorella, production for health foods has been an established industry in the Far East for over twenty five years. Since the mid-1970's, commercial Spirulina production has been carried out, first in Mexico, and since then by several companies, including two located in the United States. Spirulina is sold not only in the health food trade, but is also used in the extraction of food coloring agents and aquaculture feeds. Since the early 1980's, Dunaliella has been produced in the US, Australia, and Israel for its beta-carotene content. Microalgae are also being produced at a small scale for aquaculture feeds and several companies are developing processes for the controlled cultivation of microalgae in bioreactors for speciality products, including essential fatty acids, pigments, diagnostic reagents, etc. The commercial applications of microalgae extend to wastewater treatment, including heavy metals removal. The steady progress of microalgae industrial phycology promises to continue in the coming years and decades.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Phycology; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 28:3,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1992},
month = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1992}
}

Conference:
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