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Title: Food, fuel, and feed production with microalgae

Abstract

Large-scale (>10 hectares) microalgae cultures are being used in several countries around the world for the production of human food supplements and specialty animal (mainly aquaculture) feeds. Microalgae cultures are also extensively used in wastewater treatment and being produced on a small scale for soil inoculants and diagnostic reagents. In addition, microalgae cultures are being investigated for their potential in fuel production and CO{sub 2} utilization, as a method for greenhouse gas mitigation. A pilot plant effort in New Mexico, under a US Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Lab. subcontract, demonstrated the feasibility of cultivating a number of algal species in large outdoor ponds on brackish waters. Building on this experience, SeaAg, Inc. has developed a process for the mass culture of microalgae as a source of bivalve feeds. In this process, algae (diatoms) are cultured in large open ponds on seawater, and then fed to clams and oysters, which filter and convert the algal cells into high value protein. The SeaAg process is another application of a technology which promises to eventually result in large-scale commercial production of microalgae for a variety of useful products and processes.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Sea-Ag, Inc., Vero Beach, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
140249
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-200-5768-Vol.2; CONF-9308106-Vol.2
ON: DE94000435; TRN: 93:003832-0053
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1. biomass conference of the Americas: energy, environment, agriculture, and industry, Burlington, VT (United States), 30 Aug - 2 Sep 1993; Other Information: PBD: [1993]; Related Information: Is Part Of First Biomass Conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry; Proceedings, Volume 2; PB: 711 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; FOOD; RENEWABLE RESOURCES; FUELS; UNICELLULAR ALGAE; AQUACULTURE; ANIMAL FEEDS; BIOMASS; PRODUCTION; DIATOMS; SEAWATER; CLAMS; OYSTERS; WASTE WATER; WASTE PROCESSING; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; GREENHOUSE GASES; CARBON DIOXIDE; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; US DOE

Citation Formats

Benemann, J.R., and Weissman, J.C. Food, fuel, and feed production with microalgae. United States: N. p., 1993. Web.
Benemann, J.R., & Weissman, J.C. Food, fuel, and feed production with microalgae. United States.
Benemann, J.R., and Weissman, J.C. 1993. "Food, fuel, and feed production with microalgae". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_140249,
title = {Food, fuel, and feed production with microalgae},
author = {Benemann, J.R. and Weissman, J.C.},
abstractNote = {Large-scale (>10 hectares) microalgae cultures are being used in several countries around the world for the production of human food supplements and specialty animal (mainly aquaculture) feeds. Microalgae cultures are also extensively used in wastewater treatment and being produced on a small scale for soil inoculants and diagnostic reagents. In addition, microalgae cultures are being investigated for their potential in fuel production and CO{sub 2} utilization, as a method for greenhouse gas mitigation. A pilot plant effort in New Mexico, under a US Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Lab. subcontract, demonstrated the feasibility of cultivating a number of algal species in large outdoor ponds on brackish waters. Building on this experience, SeaAg, Inc. has developed a process for the mass culture of microalgae as a source of bivalve feeds. In this process, algae (diatoms) are cultured in large open ponds on seawater, and then fed to clams and oysters, which filter and convert the algal cells into high value protein. The SeaAg process is another application of a technology which promises to eventually result in large-scale commercial production of microalgae for a variety of useful products and processes.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month =
}

Conference:
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  • In summary, this Consortium has demonstrated a fully integrated process for the production of biofuels and high-value nutritional bioproducts at pre-commercial scale. We have achieved unprecedented yields of algal oil, and converted the oil to viable fuels. We have demonstrated the potential value of the residual product as a viable feed ingredient for many important animals in the global food supply.
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