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Title: Heat transfer analysis of the high-level waste canister

Abstract

This report documents the results of a preliminary, two-month study to determine the design constraints imposed by heat transfer considerations on canisters containing solidified, high-level nuclear waste. The waste is derived from the reprocessing of light water reactor fuel for uranium recycle at 160 days after reactor discharge. The study was conducted for Rockwell Hanford Operations in support of their high-level Waste Canister Envelope study. Candidate solidified waste forms considered in this study are in-can melted borosilicate glass and stabilized calcine. Each canister is assumed to be ten feet long, filled with waste to a height of eight feet, and fabricated of 304L stainless steel. Air- and water-cooled interim storage of the canister at the Fuels Reprocessing Plant (FRP) are considered prior to ultimate storage in deep geologic media at Federal repositories. Candidate repository media are salt, shale and basalt. Canister design constraints arise because of the need to maintain the waste forms, canisters, and geologic media below certain critical temperatures. Design constraints, in terms of the maximum allowable canister diameter and heat load, are presented for interim storage at the FRP and for ultimate storage at the repositories. For interim storage, these constraints are presented parametrically in terms of:more » the time since reprocessing (i.e., the waste age) at which the canister is filled and enters interim storage; the type of cooling used during interim storage; the temperature constraints that may be imposed; and whether or not the canister is overpacked. For geologic storage it is assumed that the canister is overpacked and enters geologic storage ten years after reprocessing. Preliminary conclusions, and recommendations for future analyses, are presented.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
TRW Defense and Space Systems Group, Redondo Beach, CA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6941709
Report Number(s):
RHO-C-9
TRN: 78-017095
DOE Contract Number:  
EY-77-C-06-1030
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; CASKS; HEAT TRANSFER; RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE; BASALT; DESIGN; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; GLASS; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; SALT DEPOSITS; SHALES; CONTAINERS; ENERGY TRANSFER; IGNEOUS ROCKS; MANAGEMENT; METAMORPHIC ROCKS; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; ROCKS; STORAGE; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTE STORAGE; WASTES; 052002* - Nuclear Fuels- Waste Disposal & Storage

Citation Formats

Bell, J. M., Nienberg, J. W., Seidman, M. H., and Fink, L. C. Heat transfer analysis of the high-level waste canister. United States: N. p., 1977. Web. doi:10.2172/6941709.
Bell, J. M., Nienberg, J. W., Seidman, M. H., & Fink, L. C. Heat transfer analysis of the high-level waste canister. United States. doi:10.2172/6941709.
Bell, J. M., Nienberg, J. W., Seidman, M. H., and Fink, L. C. Wed . "Heat transfer analysis of the high-level waste canister". United States. doi:10.2172/6941709. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6941709.
@article{osti_6941709,
title = {Heat transfer analysis of the high-level waste canister},
author = {Bell, J. M. and Nienberg, J. W. and Seidman, M. H. and Fink, L. C.},
abstractNote = {This report documents the results of a preliminary, two-month study to determine the design constraints imposed by heat transfer considerations on canisters containing solidified, high-level nuclear waste. The waste is derived from the reprocessing of light water reactor fuel for uranium recycle at 160 days after reactor discharge. The study was conducted for Rockwell Hanford Operations in support of their high-level Waste Canister Envelope study. Candidate solidified waste forms considered in this study are in-can melted borosilicate glass and stabilized calcine. Each canister is assumed to be ten feet long, filled with waste to a height of eight feet, and fabricated of 304L stainless steel. Air- and water-cooled interim storage of the canister at the Fuels Reprocessing Plant (FRP) are considered prior to ultimate storage in deep geologic media at Federal repositories. Candidate repository media are salt, shale and basalt. Canister design constraints arise because of the need to maintain the waste forms, canisters, and geologic media below certain critical temperatures. Design constraints, in terms of the maximum allowable canister diameter and heat load, are presented for interim storage at the FRP and for ultimate storage at the repositories. For interim storage, these constraints are presented parametrically in terms of: the time since reprocessing (i.e., the waste age) at which the canister is filled and enters interim storage; the type of cooling used during interim storage; the temperature constraints that may be imposed; and whether or not the canister is overpacked. For geologic storage it is assumed that the canister is overpacked and enters geologic storage ten years after reprocessing. Preliminary conclusions, and recommendations for future analyses, are presented.},
doi = {10.2172/6941709},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1977},
month = {11}
}