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Title: Spatially localized sup 1 H NMR spectra of metabolites in the human brain

Abstract

Using a surface coil, the authors have obtained {sup 1}H NMR spectra from metabolites in the human brain. Localization was achieved by combining depth pulses with image-selected in vivo spectroscopy magnetic field gradient methods. {sup 1}H spectra in which total creatine (3.03 ppm) has a signal/noise ratio of 95:1 were obtained in 4 min from 14 ml of brain. A resonance at 2.02 ppm consisting predominantly of N-acetylaspartate was measured relative to the creatine peak in gray and white matter, and the ratio was lower in the white matter. The spin-spin relaxation times of N-acetylaspartate and creatine were measured in white and gray matter and while creatine relaxation times were the same in both, the N-acetylaspartate relaxation time was longer in white matter. Lactate was detected in the normoxic brain and the average of three measurements was {approx}0.5 mM from comparison with the creatine plus phosphocreatine peak, which was assumed to be 10.5 mM.

Authors:
 [1]; ; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))
  2. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA))
  3. (Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6896403
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America; (USA); Journal Volume: 85:6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BRAIN; NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE; METABOLITES; NMR SPECTRA; ASPARTIC ACID; CREATINE; LACTATES; MAN; PROTONS; RELAXATION TIME; SPIN-SPIN RELAXATION; AMINO ACIDS; ANIMALS; BARYONS; BODY; CARBOXYLIC ACID SALTS; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; ELEMENTARY PARTICLES; FERMIONS; HADRONS; MAGNETIC RESONANCE; MAMMALS; NERVOUS SYSTEM; NUCLEONS; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; PRIMATES; RELAXATION; RESONANCE; SPECTRA; VERTEBRATES 550601* -- Medicine-- Unsealed Radionuclides in Diagnostics

Citation Formats

Hanstock, C.C., Rothman, D.L., Jue, T., Shulman, R.G., and Prichard, J.W.. Spatially localized sup 1 H NMR spectra of metabolites in the human brain. United States: N. p., 1988. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.85.6.1821.
Hanstock, C.C., Rothman, D.L., Jue, T., Shulman, R.G., & Prichard, J.W.. Spatially localized sup 1 H NMR spectra of metabolites in the human brain. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.85.6.1821.
Hanstock, C.C., Rothman, D.L., Jue, T., Shulman, R.G., and Prichard, J.W.. 1988. "Spatially localized sup 1 H NMR spectra of metabolites in the human brain". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.85.6.1821.
@article{osti_6896403,
title = {Spatially localized sup 1 H NMR spectra of metabolites in the human brain},
author = {Hanstock, C.C. and Rothman, D.L. and Jue, T. and Shulman, R.G. and Prichard, J.W.},
abstractNote = {Using a surface coil, the authors have obtained {sup 1}H NMR spectra from metabolites in the human brain. Localization was achieved by combining depth pulses with image-selected in vivo spectroscopy magnetic field gradient methods. {sup 1}H spectra in which total creatine (3.03 ppm) has a signal/noise ratio of 95:1 were obtained in 4 min from 14 ml of brain. A resonance at 2.02 ppm consisting predominantly of N-acetylaspartate was measured relative to the creatine peak in gray and white matter, and the ratio was lower in the white matter. The spin-spin relaxation times of N-acetylaspartate and creatine were measured in white and gray matter and while creatine relaxation times were the same in both, the N-acetylaspartate relaxation time was longer in white matter. Lactate was detected in the normoxic brain and the average of three measurements was {approx}0.5 mM from comparison with the creatine plus phosphocreatine peak, which was assumed to be 10.5 mM.},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.85.6.1821},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 85:6,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 3
}
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