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Title: Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-329-1898, Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois

Abstract

In response to a request from the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois, assistance was given to determine the degree of employee exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation from the particle-accelerator systems. High-power RF amplifiers are used to accelerate protons and antiprotons to extremely high energies. Research is conducted at the lab in the area of high-energy physics. Monitoring was carried out for static magnetic and radiofrequency fields in the Linac, Booster, and Main Ring areas. Static magnetic field levels were quite low, except for the levels measured near the Bubble Chamber. RF radiation did not exceed the American National Standard Institute standards for electric and magnetic fields. The authors concluded that RF exposures at Fermi did not constitute a hazard to workers at the time of the evaluation. The authors recommend that the static magnetic fields should be monitored and documented for possible future analysis. Field-monitoring instruments should be obtained. The sources of potential water leaks should be eliminated within the booster area. Flammable material should be removed from electronic cabinets.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6864207
Report Number(s):
PB-89-120646/XAB; HETA-87-329-1898
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; FERMILAB ACCELERATOR; RF SYSTEMS; MAGNETIC FIELDS; HEALTH HAZARDS; RADIOWAVE RADIATION; RADIATION HAZARDS; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE; INSPECTION; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; RECOMMENDATIONS; TOXICITY; ACCELERATORS; CYCLIC ACCELERATORS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; HAZARDS; MATERIALS; MEDICINE; RADIATIONS; SYNCHROTRONS 560400* -- Other Environmental Pollutant Effects; 430000 -- Particle Accelerators

Citation Formats

Moss, C.E., and Boiano, J.M. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-329-1898, Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Moss, C.E., & Boiano, J.M. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-329-1898, Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois. United States.
Moss, C.E., and Boiano, J.M. 1988. "Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-329-1898, Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6864207,
title = {Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-329-1898, Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois},
author = {Moss, C.E. and Boiano, J.M.},
abstractNote = {In response to a request from the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois, assistance was given to determine the degree of employee exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation from the particle-accelerator systems. High-power RF amplifiers are used to accelerate protons and antiprotons to extremely high energies. Research is conducted at the lab in the area of high-energy physics. Monitoring was carried out for static magnetic and radiofrequency fields in the Linac, Booster, and Main Ring areas. Static magnetic field levels were quite low, except for the levels measured near the Bubble Chamber. RF radiation did not exceed the American National Standard Institute standards for electric and magnetic fields. The authors concluded that RF exposures at Fermi did not constitute a hazard to workers at the time of the evaluation. The authors recommend that the static magnetic fields should be monitored and documented for possible future analysis. Field-monitoring instruments should be obtained. The sources of potential water leaks should be eliminated within the booster area. Flammable material should be removed from electronic cabinets.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 5
}

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