skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Inhibition of hematopoietic recovery from radiation-induced myelosuppression by natural killer cells

Abstract

We have examined the role of natural killer (NK) cells in situ in the recovery of marrow hematopoiesis in B6D2F1 mice receiving various doses of total-body irradiation (TBI) as a well-characterized model for treatment-induced myelosuppression. Applying an in situ cytotoxic approach for ablating NK 1.1 cells, we have demonstrated that NK 1.1 cells differentially inhibit the recovery of hematopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) and their progenitor cells committed to granulocyte-macrophage differentiation from a sublethal dose of TBI (9 Gy) while not affecting the recovery of progenitor cells committed to either erythroid or megakaryocyte differentiation from TBI. However, recoveries of CFU-S and progenitor cells were unaffected by the ablation of NK cells prior to a moderate dose of TBI (2 Gy). These findings provide in situ evidence that NK cells are potential inhibitors of hematopoietic recovery from treatment-induced myelosuppression.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (Wayne State Univ. School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6743172
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Radiation Research; (USA); Journal Volume: 122:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; IMMUNE SYSTEM DISEASES; RADIOINDUCTION; LYMPHOCYTES; BIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS; STEM CELLS; BIOLOGICAL RECOVERY; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; CELL DIFFERENTIATION; MACROPHAGES; MICE; WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATION; ANIMAL CELLS; ANIMALS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BLOOD; BLOOD CELLS; BODY FLUIDS; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; DISEASES; EXTERNAL IRRADIATION; FUNCTIONS; IRRADIATION; LEUKOCYTES; MAMMALS; MATERIALS; PHAGOCYTES; RADIATION EFFECTS; RECOVERY; RODENTS; SOMATIC CELLS; VERTEBRATES 560152* -- Radiation Effects on Animals-- Animals

Citation Formats

Pantel, K., Boertman, J., and Nakeff, A. Inhibition of hematopoietic recovery from radiation-induced myelosuppression by natural killer cells. United States: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.2307/3577602.
Pantel, K., Boertman, J., & Nakeff, A. Inhibition of hematopoietic recovery from radiation-induced myelosuppression by natural killer cells. United States. doi:10.2307/3577602.
Pantel, K., Boertman, J., and Nakeff, A. 1990. "Inhibition of hematopoietic recovery from radiation-induced myelosuppression by natural killer cells". United States. doi:10.2307/3577602.
@article{osti_6743172,
title = {Inhibition of hematopoietic recovery from radiation-induced myelosuppression by natural killer cells},
author = {Pantel, K. and Boertman, J. and Nakeff, A.},
abstractNote = {We have examined the role of natural killer (NK) cells in situ in the recovery of marrow hematopoiesis in B6D2F1 mice receiving various doses of total-body irradiation (TBI) as a well-characterized model for treatment-induced myelosuppression. Applying an in situ cytotoxic approach for ablating NK 1.1 cells, we have demonstrated that NK 1.1 cells differentially inhibit the recovery of hematopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) and their progenitor cells committed to granulocyte-macrophage differentiation from a sublethal dose of TBI (9 Gy) while not affecting the recovery of progenitor cells committed to either erythroid or megakaryocyte differentiation from TBI. However, recoveries of CFU-S and progenitor cells were unaffected by the ablation of NK cells prior to a moderate dose of TBI (2 Gy). These findings provide in situ evidence that NK cells are potential inhibitors of hematopoietic recovery from treatment-induced myelosuppression.},
doi = {10.2307/3577602},
journal = {Radiation Research; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 122:2,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 5
}
  • In vitro exposure of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to ultraviolet B (uvB) radiation has been shown to inhibit natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent fashion. The purpose of this study was to examine the manner by which uvB produced these deleterious effects. Inhibition of NK activity was not due to lethal injury to NK cells since the viability of cell populations enriched for NK activity was greater than 90% with the uvB doses employed. uvB appeared to directly affect NK cells since procedures which removed suppressor mechanisms, such as removal of monocytes and pharmacologic inhibition ofmore » the cyclooxygenase pathway, failed to reverse the response. Furthermore, no suppression of activity of unirradiated NK cells could be produced by coincubation of unirradiated NK cells with uv-irradiated NK cells. When the single cell assay for binding and killing was employed to determine at which stage in the lytic sequence inhibition occurred, it was found that binding was normal but lysis of bound targets and the recycling capacity of active NK cells were markedly reduced. At uvB doses above 50 J/m2, both interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) and interleukin 2 (IL-2) were ineffective in augmenting NK cell-mediated cytotoxic reactions after cells had been irradiated with uvB. Furthermore, incubation of NK cells with IFN-alpha prior to irradiation failed to protect against the inhibitory effects. These studies provide evidence that in vitro exposure of NK cells to uvB radiation inhibits their function by a direct nonlethal effect and that this inhibition occurs selectively at the postbinding stage of target cell lysis.« less
  • Natural killer (NK) cells are reported to have an important role in the resistance of lethally irradiated recipients to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Therefore, we investigated the effects of recipient NK depletion on survival, chimerism, and hematopoietic reconstitution after lethal irradiation and the transplantation of limiting amounts of T-cell-deficient bone marrow (BM). When administered before BMT, anti-asialo GM1 (ASGM1) antiserum treatment, effective in depleting in vivo NK activity, was associated with a marked increase in survival in 3 of 3 allogeneic combinations (BALB/c into C3H/HeN, C57B1/6, or C3B6F1). This enhanced survival was independent of the susceptibility of each recipient strainmore » to accept BALB/c BM. Moreover, recipient anti-ASGM1 treatment was also effective in increasing survival in recipients of syngeneic BM, suggesting that NK cells can adversely affect engraftment independent of genetically controlled polymorphic cell surface determinants. Analysis of chimerism in surviving animals 2 months post-BMT showed that recipient NK depletion significantly increased the level of donor engraftment when high doses of BM were transplanted. These studies also demonstrated that anti-ASGM1 pretreatment mainly resulted in an increase in extramedullary hematopoiesis in the second and third week after irradiation. Anti-ASGM1 treatment also dramatically accelerated the rate of appearance of donor-derived cells with a higher level of donor-cell engraftment apparent at a time when the differences in survival between NK-depleted and control BMT recipients became significant. Peripheral cell counts were also affected by NK depletion, with significantly enhanced platelet and red blood cell recovery and a moderate increase in granulocyte recovery.« less
  • The relationship of the leukemogenic and natural killer (NK)-suppressive effects of fractionated doses of gamma-radiation in mice was studied. A/J mice were relatively resistant; CBA/J, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 were susceptible to both the NK-suppressive and leukemogenic effects, and young (1 mo old) C57BL/6 mice were more susceptible than were 2- and 3-month-old C57BL/6 mice to both effects. Age-dependent susceptibility to radiation-induced leukemogenesis also was observed in C57BL/6 (bg/bg) (beige) mice. No differences in incidence and latent period of lymphoma development were found between C57BL/6 (+/+) and beige mice. Bone marrow cells (BMC) from normal C57BL/6 donors reconstituted the NK reactivitymore » of irradiated C57BL/6 (+/+) or beige recipients and inhibited leukemogenesis. Although BMC of beige donors did not reconstitute the NK reactivity of irradiated C57BL/6 (+/+) or beige recipients, these cells were as efficient for antileukemic protection as were BMC from C57BL/6 (+/+) mice. The bone marrow of irradiated mice contained preleukemia cells that produced leukemias when transplanted iv into recipients preirradiated with 400 R. Inoculation (iv) of spleen cells (SpC) from syngeneic nude mice plus preleukemia bone marrow cells (PBMC) were able to inhibit leukemia formation in the 400 R-irradiated recipients. SpC from beige mice, normal C57BL/6 (+/+) mice, or C57BL/6 (+/+) mice treated with anti-asialo GM1 serum had no influence on the development of leukemia after their transplantation with PBMC.« less
  • D-type cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk-4) are likely involved in regulating passage of cells through the G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle. A decrease in the proportion of cells in G{sub 1}, a relatively radiation-sensitive phase of the cell cycle, should result in increased resistance to ionizing radiation; however, the effect of such overexpression on X-ray-induced G{sub 1}-phase arrest is not known. Radiation survival curves were obtained at a dose rate of either 8 cGy/min or 1 Gy/min for subclones of the IL-3-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cell line 32D cl 3 expressing transgenes for either cyclin-D1, D2 or D3 ormore » cdk-4. We compared the results to those with overexpression of the transgene for Bcl-2, whose expression enhances radiation survival and delays apoptosis. Cells overexpressing transgenes for each D-type cyclin or Bcl-2 had an increased number of cells in S phase compared to parent line 32D cl 3; however, overexpression of cdk-4 had no effect on cell cycle distribution. Cell death resulting from withdrawal of IL-3 was not affected by overexpression of D2, cdk-4 or Bcl-2. Flow cytometry 24 h after 5 Gy irradiation demonstrated that overexpression of each G{sub 1}-phase regulatory transgene decreased the proportion of cells at the G{sub 1}/S-phase border. Western analysis revealed induction of cyclin-D protein levels by irradiation, but no change in the D{sub O}, but a significant increase in the {rvec n} for cyclin-D or cdk-4 transgene-overexpressing clones at 1 Gy/min (P<0.017). At a lower dose rate of 8 cGy/min, the {rvec n} for cyclin or cdk-4-overexpressing clones was also increased (P<0.7). Thus overexpression of cyclin-D or cdk-4 in hematopoietic cells induces detectable effects on hematopoietic cell radiation biology including a broadening of the shoulder on the radiation survival curve and a decrease in radiation-induced G{sub 1}/S-phase arrest. 31 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.« less
  • Previous studies in rodents have shown that ultraviolet radiation (UVR) may have direct effects on the immune system in the skin and at higher doses may induce systemic suppression of immune responses. We have previously shown that UVR from sun or solarium beds may induce systemic effects in human subjects. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether these systemic effects in human subjects could be prevented by use of commercially available sunscreen agents. Groups of 12 normal subjects were exposed to radiation from solarium lamps after application of a sunscreen agent or the base used in itsmore » preparation. Twelve half-hourly exposures induced a depression of natural killer (NK) cell activity against a melanoma and the K562 target cell which was not prevented by use of the sunscreen agent. Changes in functional activity were accompanied by a reduction in NK cell numbers assessed by Leu-11 monoclonal antibodies against the labile Fc receptor. Application of the sunscreen agent also did not protect against effects of solarium exposure on recall antigen skin tests and immunoglobulin production in vitro in pokeweed mitogen-stimulated cultures of B and T cells. These results suggest that further evaluation of the wave-length spectrum of UVR and the effectiveness of sunscreen agents in prevention of UVR-induced effects on the immune system is needed.« less