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Title: Cancer hazards caused by nickel and chromium exposure

Abstract

An increased risk of cancer associated with nickel refining and with chromate production has been known for some decades. The occupational exposure pattern of both nickel and chromium is very complex. Nickel subsulfide may be the most potent carcinogen among the different nickel compounds. A correlation between lung cancer and exposure to chromates has been shown in several studies. Hexavalent chromium has been suggested as the causative carcinogen among platers and ferrochromium workers. There is an urgent need for careful dose registration before a quantitative cancer risk analysis can be performed for the nickel and chromium industry.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Inst. of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway
OSTI Identifier:
6671606
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Toxicol. Environ. Health; (United States); Journal Volume: 6:5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; CARCINOGENESIS; RISK ASSESSMENT; CHROMATES; CHROMIUM; CHROMIUM OXIDES; LUNGS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; NICKEL; ELECTROREFINING; WELDING; NICKEL SULFIDES; AIR; NEOPLASMS; OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY; PERSONNEL; POTASSIUM COMPOUNDS; QUANTITY RATIO; SODIUM COMPOUNDS; URINE; ALKALI METAL COMPOUNDS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BIOLOGICAL WASTES; BODY; BODY FLUIDS; CHALCOGENIDES; CHROMIUM COMPOUNDS; DISEASES; ELECTROLYSIS; ELEMENTS; FABRICATION; FLUIDS; GASES; JOINING; LYSIS; MATERIALS; METALS; NICKEL COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PATHOGENESIS; PROCESSING; REFINING; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM; SAFETY; SULFIDES; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPOUNDS; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; WASTES 560306* -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology-- Man-- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Norseth, T. Cancer hazards caused by nickel and chromium exposure. United States: N. p., 1980. Web. doi:10.1080/15287398009529940.
Norseth, T. Cancer hazards caused by nickel and chromium exposure. United States. doi:10.1080/15287398009529940.
Norseth, T. 1980. "Cancer hazards caused by nickel and chromium exposure". United States. doi:10.1080/15287398009529940.
@article{osti_6671606,
title = {Cancer hazards caused by nickel and chromium exposure},
author = {Norseth, T.},
abstractNote = {An increased risk of cancer associated with nickel refining and with chromate production has been known for some decades. The occupational exposure pattern of both nickel and chromium is very complex. Nickel subsulfide may be the most potent carcinogen among the different nickel compounds. A correlation between lung cancer and exposure to chromates has been shown in several studies. Hexavalent chromium has been suggested as the causative carcinogen among platers and ferrochromium workers. There is an urgent need for careful dose registration before a quantitative cancer risk analysis can be performed for the nickel and chromium industry.},
doi = {10.1080/15287398009529940},
journal = {J. Toxicol. Environ. Health; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 6:5,
place = {United States},
year = 1980,
month = 9
}
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