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Title: Membrane-associated 41-kDa GTP-binding protein in collagen-induced platelet activation

Abstract

Initially we established that the binding of collagen to human blood platelets stimulates both the rapid loss of PIP2 and the generation of inositol-4,5-bisphosphate (IP2) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). These results indicate that the binding of collagen stimulates inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C during platelet activation. The fact that GTP or GTP-gamma-S augments, and pertussis toxin inhibits, collagen-induced IP3 formation suggests that a GTP-binding protein or (or proteins) may be directly involved in the regulation of phospholipase C-mediated phosphoinositide turnover in human platelets. We have used several complementary techniques to isolate and characterize a platelet 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) that has a number of structural and functional similarities to the regulatory alpha i subunit of the GTP-binding proteins isolated from bovine brain. This 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) is found to be closely associated with at least four membrane glycoproteins (e.g., gp180, gp110, gp95, and gp75) in a 330-kDa complex that can be dissociated by treatment with high salt plus urea. Most important, we have demonstrated that antilymphoma 41-kDa (alpha i subunit of GTP-binding proteins) antibody cross-reacts with the platelet 41-kDa protein (or proteins) and the alpha i subunit of bovine brain Gi alpha proteins, and blocks GTP/collagen-induced IP3 formation. These data providemore » strong evidence that the 41-kDa platelet GTP-binding protein (or proteins) is directly involved in collagen-induced signal transduction during platelet activation.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (Univ. of Miami Medical School, FL (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6623020
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6623020
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: FASEB Journal (Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology); (USA); Journal Volume: 4:11
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; COLLAGEN; BIOCHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS; LIPASES; ENZYME ACTIVITY; MEMBRANE PROTEINS; BIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS; PHOSPHOLIPIDS; BIOSYNTHESIS; ADP; AUTORADIOGRAPHY; BLOOD PLATELETS; INHIBITION; MOLECULAR WEIGHT; PHOSPHORUS ISOTOPES; TOXINS; ANTIGENS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BLOOD; BLOOD CELLS; BODY FLUIDS; CARBOXYLESTERASES; ENZYMES; ESTERASES; ESTERS; FUNCTIONS; HYDROLASES; ISOTOPES; KINETICS; LIPIDS; MATERIALS; NUCLEOTIDES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS; PROTEINS; REACTION KINETICS; SCLEROPROTEINS; SYNTHESIS; TOXIC MATERIALS 550201* -- Biochemistry-- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Walker, G., and Bourguignon, L.Y. Membrane-associated 41-kDa GTP-binding protein in collagen-induced platelet activation. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Walker, G., & Bourguignon, L.Y. Membrane-associated 41-kDa GTP-binding protein in collagen-induced platelet activation. United States.
Walker, G., and Bourguignon, L.Y. Wed . "Membrane-associated 41-kDa GTP-binding protein in collagen-induced platelet activation". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6623020,
title = {Membrane-associated 41-kDa GTP-binding protein in collagen-induced platelet activation},
author = {Walker, G. and Bourguignon, L.Y.},
abstractNote = {Initially we established that the binding of collagen to human blood platelets stimulates both the rapid loss of PIP2 and the generation of inositol-4,5-bisphosphate (IP2) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). These results indicate that the binding of collagen stimulates inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C during platelet activation. The fact that GTP or GTP-gamma-S augments, and pertussis toxin inhibits, collagen-induced IP3 formation suggests that a GTP-binding protein or (or proteins) may be directly involved in the regulation of phospholipase C-mediated phosphoinositide turnover in human platelets. We have used several complementary techniques to isolate and characterize a platelet 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) that has a number of structural and functional similarities to the regulatory alpha i subunit of the GTP-binding proteins isolated from bovine brain. This 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) is found to be closely associated with at least four membrane glycoproteins (e.g., gp180, gp110, gp95, and gp75) in a 330-kDa complex that can be dissociated by treatment with high salt plus urea. Most important, we have demonstrated that antilymphoma 41-kDa (alpha i subunit of GTP-binding proteins) antibody cross-reacts with the platelet 41-kDa protein (or proteins) and the alpha i subunit of bovine brain Gi alpha proteins, and blocks GTP/collagen-induced IP3 formation. These data provide strong evidence that the 41-kDa platelet GTP-binding protein (or proteins) is directly involved in collagen-induced signal transduction during platelet activation.},
doi = {},
journal = {FASEB Journal (Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology); (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 4:11,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1990},
month = {Wed Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1990}
}
  • Platelet inhibition by agents that increase intracellular levels of cAMP is associated with cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of specific intracellular proteins, including a membrane-associated 22-kDa microsomal protein called thrombolamban. In view of recent studies suggesting that platelets also contain 22-kDa GTP-binding proteins that are homologous with ras-encoded p21 proteins, the present work was undertaken to examine the possibility that thrombolamban and the Ras-like proteins were the same. Platelet microsomes were labeled with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP and the labeled proteins were examined by autoradiography of sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gels. On Western blots of both one-dimensional and two-dimensional gels, thrombolamban immunoreacted with M90, a monoclonalmore » antibody that recognizes the GTP-binding domain of Ras p21 proteins, but not with Y13-259, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes another domain and is specific for Ras proteins. Overlay experiments with unlabeled platelet microsomes demonstrated numerous low molecular weight proteins that bound ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)GTP, although none could be identified as thrombolamban. Finally, thrombolamban was immunoprecipitated by M90. These studies show that thrombolamban is a low molecular weight protein that is immunologically related to the Ras family of GTP-binding proteins.« less
  • ADP-ribosylation induced by cholera toxin and pertussis toxin was studied in particulate and cytosolic fractions of human platelets. Platelets were disrupted by a cycle of freezing and thawing in the presence of a hyposmotic buffer containing protease inhibitors. In both fractions, the A subunit of cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates two proteins with molecular masses of 42 and 44 kDa, whereas pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylates a 41-kDa polypeptide. Two antisera against the {alpha} subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein recognize only the 42-kDa polypeptide. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of the 42- and 44-kDa proteins is reduced by pretreatment of platelets with iloprost,more » a prostacyclin analog. The 44-kDa protein, which is substrate of cholera toxin, could be extracted completely from the membrane and recovered in the cytosolic fraction when the cells were disrupted by Dounce homogenization and the pellet was extensively washed. A 44-kDa protein can also be labeled with 8-azidoguanosine 5{prime}-({alpha}-{sup 32}P)triphosphate in the cytosol and membranes. These finding indicate that cholera and pertussis toxins produced covalent modifications of proteins present in particulate and cytosolic platelet fractions. Moreover, the 44-kDa protein might be an {alpha} subunit of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein that is not recognized by available antisera.« less
  • Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin,more » or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.« less
  • We report the molecular cloning of the human gene (symbol LRPAP1) coding for the {alpha}{sub 2}-macroglobulin receptor-associated protein (A2MRAP), as well as the gene coding for the 44-kDa heparin-binding protein (HBP-44), its murine counterpart. For both, genomic cosmid clones were isolated, and for the human gene a bacteriophage P1 clone containing the entire A2MRAP gene was also retrieved. The genes were characterized after subcloning: in both species, the known coding part of the cDNA is encoded by eight exons, and the position of the boundaries of the exons was conserved. The human LRPAP1 locus was assigned to chromosome 4 bymore » PCR of human-hamster hybrid cell lines and by fluorescence in situ hybridization to band 4p16.3. This maps closely to the variable constitutional deletions of the short arm of chromosome 4, observed cytogenetically in patients with the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. Metaphase spreads of two such patients were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with an LRPAP1 genomic probe. The first patient, with karyotype 46,XY,del4(p14-p16.1), had retained both copies of the LRPAP1 gene. In contrast, the other patient, with karyotype 46,XY,del4(p15.3-pter), displayed no signal for LRPAP1 on the deleted chromosome. 44 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • The authors transfected COS cells with cDNAs for the {alpha} subunits of stimulatory and inhibitory GTP-binding proteins, {alpha}{sub s} and {alpha}{sub i1}, respectively, and immunoprecipitated the metabolically labeled products with specific peptide antibodies. Cells were separated into particulate and soluble fractions before immunoprecipitation; ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled {alpha}{sub s} and {alpha}{sub i} were both found primarily in the particulate fraction. ({sup 3}H)Myristate was incorporated into endogenous and transfected {alpha}{sub i} but could not be detected in {alpha}{sub s} even when it was overexpressed. They converted the second residue, glycine, of {alpha}{sub i1} into alanine by site-directed mutagenesis. Upon transfection of the mutantmore » {alpha}{sub i1} into COS cells, the ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled product was localized primarily to the soluble fraction, and, also unlike normal {alpha}{sub i1}, the mutant failed to incorporate ({sup 3}H)myristate. The unmyristoylated mutant {alpha}{sub i1} could still interact with the {beta}-{gamma} complex, since purified {beta}{gamma} subunits promoted pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of both the normal and mutant {alpha}{sub i1} subunits. These results indicate that myristoylation is critical for membrane attachment of {alpha}{sub i} but not {alpha}{sub s} subunits.« less