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Title: Interaction of electromagnetic fields with chondrocytes in gel culture. Final report, February-August 1989

Abstract

The research accomplished during this project period focused on control experiments designed to establish whether cartilage cells from normal cartilage will continue to synthesize and accumulate normal extracellular matrix in agarose gel culture. This information is essential to properly design experiments to qualify changes in chondrocyte biosynthesis due to applied electromagnetic fields. The results suggest that both normal chondrocytes and swarm rat chondrosarcoma cells in agarose culture can continue to synthesize matrix macromolecules at a rate similar to or slightly higher than that in normal cartilage; also, that chondrocytes in agarose can successfully mediate assembly and accumulation of normal, mechanically functional extracellular matrix.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
OSTI Identifier:
6612422
Report Number(s):
AD-A-223397/1/XAB
CNN: F33615-87-D-0626
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ANIMAL CELLS; SENSITIVITY; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BIOSYNTHESIS; CARTILAGE; PROGRESS REPORT; RATS; TISSUE CULTURES; ANIMAL TISSUES; ANIMALS; BODY; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; DOCUMENT TYPES; MAMMALS; RODENTS; SYNTHESIS; TISSUES; VERTEBRATES 560400* -- Other Environmental Pollutant Effects

Citation Formats

Grodzinsky, A.J., Gluzband, Y.A., and Buschmann, M.D. Interaction of electromagnetic fields with chondrocytes in gel culture. Final report, February-August 1989. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Grodzinsky, A.J., Gluzband, Y.A., & Buschmann, M.D. Interaction of electromagnetic fields with chondrocytes in gel culture. Final report, February-August 1989. United States.
Grodzinsky, A.J., Gluzband, Y.A., and Buschmann, M.D. 1990. "Interaction of electromagnetic fields with chondrocytes in gel culture. Final report, February-August 1989". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6612422,
title = {Interaction of electromagnetic fields with chondrocytes in gel culture. Final report, February-August 1989},
author = {Grodzinsky, A.J. and Gluzband, Y.A. and Buschmann, M.D.},
abstractNote = {The research accomplished during this project period focused on control experiments designed to establish whether cartilage cells from normal cartilage will continue to synthesize and accumulate normal extracellular matrix in agarose gel culture. This information is essential to properly design experiments to qualify changes in chondrocyte biosynthesis due to applied electromagnetic fields. The results suggest that both normal chondrocytes and swarm rat chondrosarcoma cells in agarose culture can continue to synthesize matrix macromolecules at a rate similar to or slightly higher than that in normal cartilage; also, that chondrocytes in agarose can successfully mediate assembly and accumulation of normal, mechanically functional extracellular matrix.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 2
}

Technical Report:
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  • The specific objectives of this research period were: (1) to quantify the effect of applied electric fields on chondrocyte metabolism, using a range of stimulation frequencies and amplitudes; (2) to compare the chondrocyte biosynthetic response to applied fields at early times in agarose gel culture before an extracellular matrix has accumulated and at later times after significant deposition of matrix around and between the cells; and (3) to begin to interpret the biosynthetic response to applied fields in terms of models of physical mechanisms. The results of these studies suggest that electric fields applied to chondrocytes in agarose can modulatemore » the synthesis of proteoglycans and protein constituents. Biosynthesis may be inhibited or stimulated depending on the amplitude of the applied current density. In addition, the presence of extracellular matrix may enhance the ability of normal chondrocytes and cells in intact cartilage to respond to electric fields, although the presence of matrix was not required for the stimulatory response to be observed with Swarm rat chondrosarcoma cells.« less
  • The properties of the electron-ion plasma are determined by the random and collective behavior of the electrons, ions, and neutral particles. The collective as well as the random behavior of the electrons are in most cases responsible for the character of the interaction between the plasma and an applied electromagnetic field. The measurements on the transient plasmas lead to information about ways electrons are lost such as ambipolar diffusion, recombination, and attachment. Measurements of this kind were made on transient plasma for a long time with the microwave cavity method. Some measurements and conclusions are controversial because the interpreted effectsmore » are marginal. The effects are marginal because the measurements are done at too low electron densities. The objective is to extend the measurement that can be done through the interaction with an electromagnetic field into the high electron density range and resolve some controversial questions of the microwave cavity method. (auth)« less
  • This research effort was to determine theoretically a physical basis for the interaction of low-intensity externally applied electromagnetic fields with biological tissue. The primary aim of the investigation was to establish a molecular basis for the class of interactions commonly referred to as nonthermal effects of electromagnetic fields with biological systems. In particular, the biological structure of interest was the plasma membrane since it had been either directly or indirectly implicated in numerous experimental studies. It was demonstrated how a membrane undergoing a phase transition could qualitatively account for the release and/or uptake of divalent calcium ions. A characterization ofmore » changes in the structure of the membrane/electrolyte interface due to field induced changes in enzymatic activity was demonstrated. The role of critical phenomena was shown analytically to be able to account for the unique sensitivity of biomembranes to weak external field perturbations, and describe alterations in the passive transport of sodium ions in rabbit erythrocytes.« less
  • Contents include: (1) Quantum jumps; (2) Coherent transients; (3) Laser-assisted collisions; (4) Collision-induced resonant structures in laser spectroscopy; (5) Collision kernels and transport coefficients; and (6) Interactions with broadband noise.