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Title: Lung-cancer mortality in workers exposed to sulfuric acid mist and other acid mists in steel-pickling operations

Abstract

A total of 1165 steel workers who had been exposed to sulfuric acid and other acid mists during steel-pickling operations were studied to determine whether there was any evidence of respiratory cancer which could be linked to these exposures. These workers had been employed at three large midwestern steel-manufacturing operations where acid was used to remove oxides from newly produced steel. Cancer of the trachea, bronchus, and lung showed increased mortality in this study. Deaths from buccal cavity, pharynx, and larynx cancers were at normal levels. Deaths from nonmalignant respiratory diseases were lower than normal rates. The excess lung-cancer cases occurred both in workers who had been exposed only to sulfuric-acid mists and in those exposed only to other acids. The authors conclude that there was an increased risk of lung cancer in workers exposed to sulfuric acid and in workers exposed to other acids. Continued monitoring of lung-cancer rates is recommended by the authors, since other acids have replaced sulfuric acid to a great degree.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6498963
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6498963
Report Number(s):
PB-87-165221/XAB
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; VAPORS; METAL INDUSTRY; PICKLING; OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES; AIR POLLUTION; FOUNDRIES; INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE; INSPECTION; NEOPLASMS; SULFURIC ACID; TOXICITY; DISEASES; FLUIDS; GASES; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; INDUSTRY; INORGANIC ACIDS; MATERIALS; MEDICINE; POLLUTION; SURFACE TREATMENTS 550900* -- Pathology; 500200 -- Environment, Atmospheric-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Beaumont, J.J., Leveton, J., Knox, K., Bloom, T., and McQuiston, T. Lung-cancer mortality in workers exposed to sulfuric acid mist and other acid mists in steel-pickling operations. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Beaumont, J.J., Leveton, J., Knox, K., Bloom, T., & McQuiston, T. Lung-cancer mortality in workers exposed to sulfuric acid mist and other acid mists in steel-pickling operations. United States.
Beaumont, J.J., Leveton, J., Knox, K., Bloom, T., and McQuiston, T. Wed . "Lung-cancer mortality in workers exposed to sulfuric acid mist and other acid mists in steel-pickling operations". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6498963,
title = {Lung-cancer mortality in workers exposed to sulfuric acid mist and other acid mists in steel-pickling operations},
author = {Beaumont, J.J. and Leveton, J. and Knox, K. and Bloom, T. and McQuiston, T.},
abstractNote = {A total of 1165 steel workers who had been exposed to sulfuric acid and other acid mists during steel-pickling operations were studied to determine whether there was any evidence of respiratory cancer which could be linked to these exposures. These workers had been employed at three large midwestern steel-manufacturing operations where acid was used to remove oxides from newly produced steel. Cancer of the trachea, bronchus, and lung showed increased mortality in this study. Deaths from buccal cavity, pharynx, and larynx cancers were at normal levels. Deaths from nonmalignant respiratory diseases were lower than normal rates. The excess lung-cancer cases occurred both in workers who had been exposed only to sulfuric-acid mists and in those exposed only to other acids. The authors conclude that there was an increased risk of lung cancer in workers exposed to sulfuric acid and in workers exposed to other acids. Continued monitoring of lung-cancer rates is recommended by the authors, since other acids have replaced sulfuric acid to a great degree.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1986},
month = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1986}
}

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