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Title: Diesel developments for rail traction

Abstract

The latest developments in diesel rail traction systems are playing an important role in providing economical passenger transportation, especially in Europe. A new generation of diesel-hydraulic and diesel-electric traction systems - featuring reduced weight and using electronic control systems for easier operation, lower engine emissions and reduced fuel consumption - are being introduced into public and private railway networks worldwide. This paper reviews the specifications of diesel based locomotives and trains being currently supplied in Germany, China, Netherlands, Switzerland, and USA. 6 figs.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6496234
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Diesel and Gas Turbine Worldwide; (United States); Journal Volume: 27:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; DIESEL ENGINES; FUEL CONSUMPTION; USES; ELECTRIC RAILWAYS; LOCOMOTIVES; MANUFACTURERS; SPECIFICATIONS; TRAINS; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; ENGINES; HEAT ENGINES; INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES; RAILWAYS; VEHICLES 330102* -- Internal Combustion Engines-- Diesel; 330000 -- Advanced Propulsion Systems; 330400 -- Advanced Propulsion Systems-- Hybrid Systems

Citation Formats

Albrecht, A. Diesel developments for rail traction. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Albrecht, A. Diesel developments for rail traction. United States.
Albrecht, A. 1995. "Diesel developments for rail traction". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6496234,
title = {Diesel developments for rail traction},
author = {Albrecht, A.},
abstractNote = {The latest developments in diesel rail traction systems are playing an important role in providing economical passenger transportation, especially in Europe. A new generation of diesel-hydraulic and diesel-electric traction systems - featuring reduced weight and using electronic control systems for easier operation, lower engine emissions and reduced fuel consumption - are being introduced into public and private railway networks worldwide. This paper reviews the specifications of diesel based locomotives and trains being currently supplied in Germany, China, Netherlands, Switzerland, and USA. 6 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {Diesel and Gas Turbine Worldwide; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 27:2,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month = 3
}
  • Still an important player in locomotive applications, internal combustion engines (diesel locomotives) are an obvious choice for hauling most freight, for shunting applications, and for passenger lines that are not economic to electrify. Today, research and testing continue to take place on natural gas-fueled locomotives, with a net result expected to benefit the railroads through reducing operational costs, while meeting new emissions regulations. 8 figs.
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  • The influence of fuel rail pressure (FRP) and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on particulate matter (PM) formation is investigated in this paper along with notes regarding the NOx and other emissions. Increasing FRP was shown to reduce the overall soot and total PM mass for four operating conditions. These conditions included two high speed conditions (2400 rpm at 540 and 270 Nm of torque) and two moderated speed conditions (1400 rpm at 488 and 325 Nm). The concentrations of CO2 and NOx increased with fuel rail pressure and this is attributed to improved fuel-air mixing. Interestingly, the level of unburnedmore » hydrocarbons remained constant (or increased slightly) with increased FRP. PM concentration was measured using an AVL smoke meter and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS); and total PM was collected using standard gravimetric techniques. These results showed that the smoke number and particulate concentrations decrease with increasing FRP. However the decrease becomes more gradual as very high rail pressures. Additionally, the total PM decreased with increasing FRP; however, the soluble organic fraction (SOF) reaches a maximum after which it declines with higher rail pressure. The total PM was collected for the two 1400 rpm conditions downstream of the engine, diesel oxidation catalyst, and a urea-SCR catalyst. The results show that significant PM reduction occurs in the SCR catalyst even during high rates of urea dosage. Analysis of the PM indicates that residual SOF is burned up in the SCR catalyst.« less