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Title: Asbestos and gastrointestinal cancer

Abstract

Exposure to asbestos is among several factors cited as possible causes of esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancer. More than 45 published studies have presented mortality data on asbestos-exposed workers. For each cohort, the authors listed the observed and expected rates of deaths from types of gastrointestinal cancer based on the latest published follow-up. Summary standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were then derived. Finally, summary SMRs were calculated for total gastrointestinal tract cancer for three occupational groups: asbestos factory workers, insulators/shipyard workers and asbestos miners. Statistically significant elevations in summary SMRs were found for esophageal, stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer in all asbestos-exposed workers. Esophageal cancer summary SMR remained significantly elevated when data were reanalyzed to include only those cohorts with death certificate diagnoses for cause of observed deaths. However, summary SMRs were not statistically significant for stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer after reanalysis. Summary SMRs by occupational group showed a significant elevation for total gastrointestinal cancer in insulators/shipyard workers. The elevation was not significant after reanalysis. 59 references, 5 tables.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Environmental Health Associates, Inc., Oakland, CA
OSTI Identifier:
6370525
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: West. J. Med.; (United States); Journal Volume: 143:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ASBESTOS; HEALTH HAZARDS; GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT; EPIDEMIOLOGY; NEOPLASMS; DATA COMPILATION; ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE PATHWAY; ETIOLOGY; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; MINING; MORTALITY; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; REVIEWS; RISK ASSESSMENT; THERMAL INSULATION; DATA; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; DISEASES; DOCUMENT TYPES; HAZARDS; INFORMATION; NUMERICAL DATA 560306* -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology-- Man-- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Morgan, R.W., Foliart, D.E., and Wong, O.. Asbestos and gastrointestinal cancer. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Morgan, R.W., Foliart, D.E., & Wong, O.. Asbestos and gastrointestinal cancer. United States.
Morgan, R.W., Foliart, D.E., and Wong, O.. 1985. "Asbestos and gastrointestinal cancer". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6370525,
title = {Asbestos and gastrointestinal cancer},
author = {Morgan, R.W. and Foliart, D.E. and Wong, O.},
abstractNote = {Exposure to asbestos is among several factors cited as possible causes of esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancer. More than 45 published studies have presented mortality data on asbestos-exposed workers. For each cohort, the authors listed the observed and expected rates of deaths from types of gastrointestinal cancer based on the latest published follow-up. Summary standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were then derived. Finally, summary SMRs were calculated for total gastrointestinal tract cancer for three occupational groups: asbestos factory workers, insulators/shipyard workers and asbestos miners. Statistically significant elevations in summary SMRs were found for esophageal, stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer in all asbestos-exposed workers. Esophageal cancer summary SMR remained significantly elevated when data were reanalyzed to include only those cohorts with death certificate diagnoses for cause of observed deaths. However, summary SMRs were not statistically significant for stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer after reanalysis. Summary SMRs by occupational group showed a significant elevation for total gastrointestinal cancer in insulators/shipyard workers. The elevation was not significant after reanalysis. 59 references, 5 tables.},
doi = {},
journal = {West. J. Med.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 143:1,
place = {United States},
year = 1985,
month = 7
}
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