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Title: Magnetic resonance imaging of multiple sclerosis: a study of pulse-technique efficacy

Abstract

Forty-two patients with the clinical diagnosis of multiple sclerosis were examined by proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 0.5 T. An extensive protocol was used to facilitate a comparison of the efficacy of different pulse techniques. Results were also compared in 39 cases with high-resolution x-ray computed tomography (CT). MRI revealed characteristic abnormalities in each case, whereas CT was positive in only 15 of 33 patients. Cerebral abnormalities were best shown with the T2-weighted spin-echo sequence: brainstem lesions were best defined on the inversion-recovery sequence.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Vanderbilt Univ. Medical Center, Nashville, TN
OSTI Identifier:
6349031
Report Number(s):
CONF-8404183-
Journal ID: CODEN: AJRTA; TRN: 85-000460
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Am. J. Roentgenol. Radium Ther.; (United States); Journal Volume: 143:5; Conference: Annual meeting of the American Roentgen Ray Society, Las Vegas, NV, USA, 1 Apr 1984
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BRAIN; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE; NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; DIAGNOSIS; SPINAL CORD; CEREBRUM; NERVES; PATIENTS; SPIN ECHO; BODY; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; DISEASES; MAGNETIC RESONANCE; NERVOUS SYSTEM; ORGANS; RESONANCE; TOMOGRAPHY; 550602* - Medicine- External Radiation in Diagnostics- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Runge, V.M., Price, A.C., Kirshner, H.S., Allen, J.H., Partain, C.L., and James, A.E. Jr.. Magnetic resonance imaging of multiple sclerosis: a study of pulse-technique efficacy. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Runge, V.M., Price, A.C., Kirshner, H.S., Allen, J.H., Partain, C.L., & James, A.E. Jr.. Magnetic resonance imaging of multiple sclerosis: a study of pulse-technique efficacy. United States.
Runge, V.M., Price, A.C., Kirshner, H.S., Allen, J.H., Partain, C.L., and James, A.E. Jr.. Thu . "Magnetic resonance imaging of multiple sclerosis: a study of pulse-technique efficacy". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6349031,
title = {Magnetic resonance imaging of multiple sclerosis: a study of pulse-technique efficacy},
author = {Runge, V.M. and Price, A.C. and Kirshner, H.S. and Allen, J.H. and Partain, C.L. and James, A.E. Jr.},
abstractNote = {Forty-two patients with the clinical diagnosis of multiple sclerosis were examined by proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 0.5 T. An extensive protocol was used to facilitate a comparison of the efficacy of different pulse techniques. Results were also compared in 39 cases with high-resolution x-ray computed tomography (CT). MRI revealed characteristic abnormalities in each case, whereas CT was positive in only 15 of 33 patients. Cerebral abnormalities were best shown with the T2-weighted spin-echo sequence: brainstem lesions were best defined on the inversion-recovery sequence.},
doi = {},
journal = {Am. J. Roentgenol. Radium Ther.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 143:5,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1984},
month = {Thu Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1984}
}

Conference:
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