skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Robotics at Savannah River site: activity report

Abstract

The objectives of the Robotics Technology Group at the Savannah River Laboratory are to employ modern industrial robots and to develop unique automation and robotic systems to enhance process operations at the Savannah River site (SRP and SRL). The incentives are to improve safety, reduce personnel radiation exposure, improve product quality and productivity, and to reduce operating costs. During the past year robotic systems have been installed to fill chemical dilution vials in a SRP laboratory at 772-F and remove radioactive waste materials in the SRL Californium Production Facility at 773-A. A robotic system to lubricate an extrusion press has been developed and demonstrated in the SRL robotics laboratory and is scheduled for installation at the 321-M fuel fabrication area. A mobile robot was employed by SRP for a radiation monitoring task at a waste tank top in H-Area. Several other robots are installed in the SRL robotics laboratories and application development programs are underway. The status of these applications is presented in this report.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.
OSTI Identifier:
6312466
Report Number(s):
DPST-84-736
ON: DE85003657
DOE Contract Number:
AC09-76SR00001
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; ROBOTS; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; ENGINEERED SAFETY SYSTEMS; OPERATING COST; PRODUCTIVITY; QUALITY CONTROL; SAFETY; CONTROL; COST; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; US AEC; US DOE; US ERDA; US ORGANIZATIONS; 420200* - Engineering- Facilities, Equipment, & Techniques

Citation Formats

Byrd, J.S. Robotics at Savannah River site: activity report. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Byrd, J.S. Robotics at Savannah River site: activity report. United States.
Byrd, J.S. 1984. "Robotics at Savannah River site: activity report". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6312466,
title = {Robotics at Savannah River site: activity report},
author = {Byrd, J.S.},
abstractNote = {The objectives of the Robotics Technology Group at the Savannah River Laboratory are to employ modern industrial robots and to develop unique automation and robotic systems to enhance process operations at the Savannah River site (SRP and SRL). The incentives are to improve safety, reduce personnel radiation exposure, improve product quality and productivity, and to reduce operating costs. During the past year robotic systems have been installed to fill chemical dilution vials in a SRP laboratory at 772-F and remove radioactive waste materials in the SRL Californium Production Facility at 773-A. A robotic system to lubricate an extrusion press has been developed and demonstrated in the SRL robotics laboratory and is scheduled for installation at the 321-M fuel fabrication area. A mobile robot was employed by SRP for a radiation monitoring task at a waste tank top in H-Area. Several other robots are installed in the SRL robotics laboratories and application development programs are underway. The status of these applications is presented in this report.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1984,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

Save / Share:
  • The Savannah River Site has successfully used robots, teleoperators, and remote video to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, improve worker safety, and improve the quality of operations. Previous reports have described the use of mobile teleoperators in coping with a high level liquid waste spill, the removal of highly contaminated equipment, and the inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. This report will cover recent applications at the Savannah River, as well as systems which SRS has delivered to other DOE site customers.
  • The purpose of this report was to characterize the HEPA filter media material. This work consisted of two major tasks. First, the pressure drop characteristics of the HEPA filter material were measured as a function of the aerosol mass loading. Particle size effects were studied by using three different particle size distributions to load the filter material. The second task was to determine the filtration efficiency spectrum for solid particles as a function of particle diameter. The filtration efficiency was measured at two different media velocities, one corresponding to the equivalent flow rate under normal operating conditions, the other correspondingmore » to the minimum equivalent flow rate expected through the filter compartments. These tests were conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory between September 1988 and February 1989. 20 refs., 31 figs., 10 tabs.« less
  • This report presents a review of the filtration technologies available for the removal of particulate material from a gas stream. It was undertaken to identify alternate filtration technologies that may be employed in the Airborne Activity Confinement System (AACS) at the Savannah River Plant. This report is organized into six sections: (1) a discussion of the aerosol source term and its definition, (2) a short discussion of particle and gaseous contaminant removal mechanisms, (3) a brief overview of particle removal technologies, (4) a discussion of the existing AACS and its potential shortcomings, (5) an enumeration of issues to be addressedmore » in upgrading the AACS, and, (6) a detailed discussion of the identified technologies. The purpose of this report is to identity available options to the existing particle removal system. This system is in continuous operation during routine operation of the reactor. As will be seen, there are a number of options and the selection of any technology or combination of technologies will depend on the design aerosol source term (yet to be appropriately defined) as well as the flow requirements and configuration. This report does not select a specific technology. It focuses on particulate removal and qualitatively on the removal of radio-iodine and mist elimination. Candidate technologies have been selected from industrial and nuclear gas cleaning applications.« less
  • This report presents a review of the filtration technologies available for the removal of particulate material from a gas stream. It was undertaken to identify alternate filtration technologies that may be employed in the Airborne Activity Confinement System (AACS) at the Savannah River Plant. This report is organized into six sections: (1) a discussion of the aerosol source term and its definition, (2) a short discussion of particle and gaseous contaminant removal mechanisms, (3) a brief overview of particle removal technologies, (4) a discussion of the existing AACS and its potential shortcomings, (5) an enumeration of issues to be addressedmore » in upgrading the AACS, and, (6) a detailed discussion of the identified technologies. The purpose of this report is to identity available options to the existing particle removal system. This system is in continuous operation during routine operation of the reactor. As will be seen, there are a number of options and the selection of any technology or combination of technologies will depend on the design aerosol source term (yet to be appropriately defined) as well as the flow requirements and configuration. This report does not select a specific technology. It focuses on particulate removal and qualitatively on the removal of radio-iodine and mist elimination. Candidate technologies have been selected from industrial and nuclear gas cleaning applications.« less
  • This report has been prepared in response to the request by the House Appropriations Committee to address the permanent isolation and containment/removal of the contaminants associated with the seepage basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Many of the activities regarding groundwater monitoring and status referred to in this report will be discussed in detail in a companion report on the Groundwater Monitoring Program at the SRS (WSRC-RP-89-889). Seepage Basins are broadly defined as excavated, unlined earthen basins designed to receive and store, treat, or recharge various liquid waste streams. Not included in this report are basins containing only non-hazardous,more » non-radioactive constituents, such as ash basins. Fifty-four basins are discussed in this report, forty of which are inactive. Five of the remaining fourteen active basins are coal pile runoff basins, one is an ash basin that also receives coal rejects, and the remaining eight are reactor seepage basins. The Department of Energy--Savannah River (DOE-SR) has notified the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) of its intent to apply for National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits for the direct discharge of disassembly basin purge water. One the permits are issued the reactor basins will be taken out of service. All of the basins discussed in this report will be remediated under Federal and/or State regulatory environmental programs. 43 figs., 6 tabs.« less