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Title: Occupational hazards to health care workers: Diverse, ill-defined, and not fully appreciated

Abstract

Health care workers are challenged by an imposing group of occupational hazards. These hazards include exposure to ionizing radiation, stress, injury, infectious agents, and chemicals. The magnitude and diversity of these hazards are not fully appreciated. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic has created additional occupational hazards and has focused attention on the problem of occupational hazards to health care workers. Concern over the nosocomial transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus has contributed to efforts to implement universal infection control precautions and to decrease needlestick injuries. Health care organizations and providers, who have prompted health and safety campaigns for the general public, should not overlook the dangers associated with the health care setting.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, MD (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6270832
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: American Journal of Infection Control; (USA); Journal Volume: 18:5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; IONIZING RADIATIONS; RADIATION HAZARDS; XENOBIOTICS; HEALTH HAZARDS; AIDS VIRUS; MEDICAL PERSONNEL; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; RISK ASSESSMENT; HAZARDS; MICROORGANISMS; PARASITES; PERSONNEL; RADIATIONS; VIRUSES; 560151* - Radiation Effects on Animals- Man; 560300 - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Moore, R.M. Jr., and Kaczmarek, R.G. Occupational hazards to health care workers: Diverse, ill-defined, and not fully appreciated. United States: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.1016/0196-6553(90)90231-G.
Moore, R.M. Jr., & Kaczmarek, R.G. Occupational hazards to health care workers: Diverse, ill-defined, and not fully appreciated. United States. doi:10.1016/0196-6553(90)90231-G.
Moore, R.M. Jr., and Kaczmarek, R.G. 1990. "Occupational hazards to health care workers: Diverse, ill-defined, and not fully appreciated". United States. doi:10.1016/0196-6553(90)90231-G.
@article{osti_6270832,
title = {Occupational hazards to health care workers: Diverse, ill-defined, and not fully appreciated},
author = {Moore, R.M. Jr. and Kaczmarek, R.G.},
abstractNote = {Health care workers are challenged by an imposing group of occupational hazards. These hazards include exposure to ionizing radiation, stress, injury, infectious agents, and chemicals. The magnitude and diversity of these hazards are not fully appreciated. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic has created additional occupational hazards and has focused attention on the problem of occupational hazards to health care workers. Concern over the nosocomial transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus has contributed to efforts to implement universal infection control precautions and to decrease needlestick injuries. Health care organizations and providers, who have prompted health and safety campaigns for the general public, should not overlook the dangers associated with the health care setting.},
doi = {10.1016/0196-6553(90)90231-G},
journal = {American Journal of Infection Control; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 18:5,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month =
}
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