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Title: Lagoon Restoration Project: Final report

Abstract

This project is a multiyear effort focusing on energy flow in the Palace of Fine Arts lagoon just outside the Exploratorium in San Francisco. Phase 1 was a pilot study to determine the feasibility of improving biological energy flow through the small freshwater lagoon, using the expertise and resources of an environmental artist in collaboration with museum biologists and arts department staff. The primary outcome of Phase 1 is an experimental fountain exhibit inside the museum designed by public artist Laurie Lundquist with Exploratorium staff. This fountain, with signage, functions both as a model for natural aeration and filtration systems and as a focal point for museum visitors to learn about how biological processes cycle energy through aquatic systems. As part of the study of the lagoon`s health, volunteers continued biweekly bird consus from March through September, 1994. The goal was to find out whether the poor water quality of the lagoon is affecting the birds. Limited dredging was undertaken by the city Parks and Recreation Department. However, a more peermanent solution to the lagoon`s ecological problems would require an ambitious redesign of the lagoon.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
61127
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/75957-T1
ON: DE95011589; TRN: AHC29516%%63
DOE Contract Number:
FG03-94ER75957
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Mar 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS; ECOLOGY; PONDS; WATER RECLAMATION; PROGRESS REPORT; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; CALIFORNIA

Citation Formats

NONE. Lagoon Restoration Project: Final report. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.2172/61127.
NONE. Lagoon Restoration Project: Final report. United States. doi:10.2172/61127.
NONE. Wed . "Lagoon Restoration Project: Final report". United States. doi:10.2172/61127. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/61127.
@article{osti_61127,
title = {Lagoon Restoration Project: Final report},
author = {NONE},
abstractNote = {This project is a multiyear effort focusing on energy flow in the Palace of Fine Arts lagoon just outside the Exploratorium in San Francisco. Phase 1 was a pilot study to determine the feasibility of improving biological energy flow through the small freshwater lagoon, using the expertise and resources of an environmental artist in collaboration with museum biologists and arts department staff. The primary outcome of Phase 1 is an experimental fountain exhibit inside the museum designed by public artist Laurie Lundquist with Exploratorium staff. This fountain, with signage, functions both as a model for natural aeration and filtration systems and as a focal point for museum visitors to learn about how biological processes cycle energy through aquatic systems. As part of the study of the lagoon`s health, volunteers continued biweekly bird consus from March through September, 1994. The goal was to find out whether the poor water quality of the lagoon is affecting the birds. Limited dredging was undertaken by the city Parks and Recreation Department. However, a more peermanent solution to the lagoon`s ecological problems would require an ambitious redesign of the lagoon.},
doi = {10.2172/61127},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}

Technical Report:

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