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Title: The opposing effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5 prime -triphosphate, and pertussis toxin on phorbol ester induced inhibition of atrial natriuretic factor stimulated guanylate cyclase in SK-NEP-1 cells

Abstract

In the present study, we investigated the effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5{prime}-triphosphate (ATP) and pertussis toxin (PT) on phorbol ester (PMA) induced inhibition of ANF-stimulated cyclic GMP formation in cells from the human renal cell line, SK-NEP-1. PMA inhibited ANF-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity in particulate membranes by about 65%. Calmodulin reversed this inhibition in a dose dependent manner. ATP potentiated Mg++ but not Mn++ supported guanylate cyclase activity. In PMA treated membranes, ATP potentiating effects were abolished. PMA also inhibited ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation, but pretreatment with PT prevented this PMA inhibition. PT did not affect basal or ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that PMA inhibited ANF stimulation of particulate guanylate cyclase in opposition to the activating effects of calmodulin or ATP in SK-NEP-1 cells. The protein kinase C inhibitory effects appeared to be mediated via a PT-sensitive G protein.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (Alton Ochsner Medical Foundation, New Orleans, LA (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6055496
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Life Sciences; (USA); Journal Volume: 48:11
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ATP; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; CALMODULIN; CYCLASES; ENZYME ACTIVITY; PHORBOL ESTERS; TOXINS; ANIMAL CELLS; BIOSYNTHESIS; CELL MEMBRANES; INHIBITION; KIDNEYS; MAGNESIUM COMPOUNDS; MAN; MANGANESE COMPOUNDS; NUCLEOTIDES; ALKALINE EARTH METAL COMPOUNDS; ANIMALS; ANTIGENS; BODY; CARCINOGENS; CELL CONSTITUENTS; ENZYMES; ESTERS; LYASES; MAMMALS; MATERIALS; MEMBRANES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; PRIMATES; PROTEINS; SYNTHESIS; TOXIC MATERIALS; TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPOUNDS; VERTEBRATES; 560300* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Sekiya, M., Frohlich, E.D., and Cole, F.E. The opposing effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5 prime -triphosphate, and pertussis toxin on phorbol ester induced inhibition of atrial natriuretic factor stimulated guanylate cyclase in SK-NEP-1 cells. United States: N. p., 1991. Web. doi:10.1016/0024-3205(91)90508-9.
Sekiya, M., Frohlich, E.D., & Cole, F.E. The opposing effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5 prime -triphosphate, and pertussis toxin on phorbol ester induced inhibition of atrial natriuretic factor stimulated guanylate cyclase in SK-NEP-1 cells. United States. doi:10.1016/0024-3205(91)90508-9.
Sekiya, M., Frohlich, E.D., and Cole, F.E. Tue . "The opposing effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5 prime -triphosphate, and pertussis toxin on phorbol ester induced inhibition of atrial natriuretic factor stimulated guanylate cyclase in SK-NEP-1 cells". United States. doi:10.1016/0024-3205(91)90508-9.
@article{osti_6055496,
title = {The opposing effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5 prime -triphosphate, and pertussis toxin on phorbol ester induced inhibition of atrial natriuretic factor stimulated guanylate cyclase in SK-NEP-1 cells},
author = {Sekiya, M. and Frohlich, E.D. and Cole, F.E.},
abstractNote = {In the present study, we investigated the effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5{prime}-triphosphate (ATP) and pertussis toxin (PT) on phorbol ester (PMA) induced inhibition of ANF-stimulated cyclic GMP formation in cells from the human renal cell line, SK-NEP-1. PMA inhibited ANF-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity in particulate membranes by about 65%. Calmodulin reversed this inhibition in a dose dependent manner. ATP potentiated Mg++ but not Mn++ supported guanylate cyclase activity. In PMA treated membranes, ATP potentiating effects were abolished. PMA also inhibited ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation, but pretreatment with PT prevented this PMA inhibition. PT did not affect basal or ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that PMA inhibited ANF stimulation of particulate guanylate cyclase in opposition to the activating effects of calmodulin or ATP in SK-NEP-1 cells. The protein kinase C inhibitory effects appeared to be mediated via a PT-sensitive G protein.},
doi = {10.1016/0024-3205(91)90508-9},
journal = {Life Sciences; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 48:11,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1991},
month = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1991}
}
  • The authors have previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) potently inhibits PGE or forskolin-stimulation aldosterone secretion in bovine zona glomerulosa (ZG) by acting through specific high affinity receptors. In order to evaluate the functional role of the regulatory protein N/sub i/ and the inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity (AC) in ZG, the authors have studied the effect of treatment with PT on inhibition by ANF of aldosterone production. Primary cultures of ZG were treated for 18 hours in serum-free F12 medium with (0-100 ng/ml PT). No effect of PT pretreatment was observed either on basal, PGE-stimulated or ANF-inhibited levelsmore » of steroidogenesis. When membranes prepared from control ZG were ADP-ribosylated with (/sup 32/P) NAD in the presence of PT, two toxin-specific bands with 39 Kd and 41 Kd were documented on SDS gel. Cell pretreatment with as low as 1 ng/ml drastically reduced further labelling of these two bands while higher doses completely abolished them. Since PT treatment covalently modifies completely the toxin substrate without altering ANF inhibition of adrenal steroidogenesis, the authors conclude that N/sub i/ is not involved in the mode of action of ANF on aldosterone production.« less
  • Using an antiserum raised against the purified atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptor that has a disulfide-linked homodimeric structure and represents one subtype of the multiple ANP receptors, we showed that the receptor is coupled to the guanylate cyclase activation; formerly, this type of ANP receptor is not considered to be coupled to the cyclase. The specificity of the antiserum was determined by immunoblot analysis and immunoprecipitation. The anti-receptor antiserum did not compete with /sup 125/I-ANP for binding to the receptor but it lowered the affinity of the receptor. When added to bovine endothelial cell cultures, the antiserum blocked the cyclicmore » GMP response of the cells triggered by ANP. These results indicate that the subtype of the ANP receptor recognized by the antiserum is responsible for the activation of particulate guanylate cyclase as well as the double function type receptor that has been assumed to contain both the receptor domain and the catalytic domain for cGMP synthesis on the same molecule. The presence of dissociative complexes of ANP receptor and particulate guanylate cyclase was also demonstrated by radiation inactivation analysis.« less
  • The interaction between the receptor (Rc) for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the effector enzyme particulate guanylate cyclase (GC) has been studied by radiation inactivation. Irradiation of bovine lung membranes produced an increase in GC activity at low radiation doses followed by a dose-dependent reduction at higher doses. This deviation from linearity in the inactivation curve disappeared when lung membranes were pretreated with ANP. Essentially identical results were also obtained with adrenal membranes. Based on these radiation inactivation data, the following dissociative mechanism of activation of particulate guanylate cyclase by ANP has been proposed: Rc.GC(inactive) + ANP----Rc.ANP + GC(active).
  • Highlights: • Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates bi-lobal structure of CaM. • The structure and stability of the complex rely on intermolecular associations. • A novel mode of CaM-dependent activation of the adenylate cyclase toxin is proposed. - Abstract: Bordetella pertussis, causative agent of whooping cough, produces an adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) that is an important virulence factor. In the host cell, the adenylate cyclase domain of CyaA (CyaA-ACD) is activated upon association with calmodulin (CaM), an EF-hand protein comprised of N- and C-lobes (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively) connected by a flexible tether. Maximal CyaA-ACD activation is achieved throughmore » its binding to both lobes of intact CaM, but the structural mechanisms remain unclear. No high-resolution structure of the intact CaM/CyaA-ACD complex is available, but crystal structures of isolated C-CaM bound to CyaA-ACD shed light on the molecular mechanism by which this lobe activates the toxin. Previous studies using molecular modeling, biochemical, and biophysical experiments demonstrate that CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin participates in site-specific interactions with N-CaM. In this study, we utilize nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to probe the molecular association between intact CaM and CyaA-ACD. Our results indicate binding of CyaA-ACD to CaM induces large conformational perturbations mapping to C-CaM, while substantially smaller structural changes are localized primarily to helices I, II, and IV, and the metal-binding sites in N-CaM. Site-specific mutations in CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin structurally modulate N-CaM, resulting in conformational perturbations in metal binding sites I and II, while no significant structural modifications are observed in C-CaM. Moreover, dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis reveals that mutation of the β-hairpin results in a decreased hydrodynamic radius (R{sub h}) and reduced thermal stability in the mutant complex. Taken together, our data provide new structural insights into the β-hairpin’s role in stabilizing interactions between CyaA-ACD and N-CaM.« less