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Title: EXTRAN: A computer code for estimating concentrations of toxic substances at control room air intakes

Abstract

This report presents the NRC staff with a tool for assessing the potential effects of accidental releases of radioactive materials and toxic substances on habitability of nuclear facility control rooms. The tool is a computer code that estimates concentrations at nuclear facility control room air intakes given information about the release and the environmental conditions. The name of the computer code is EXTRAN. EXTRAN combines procedures for estimating the amount of airborne material, a Gaussian puff dispersion model, and the most recent algorithms for estimating diffusion coefficients in building wakes. It is a modular computer code, written in FORTRAN-77, that runs on personal computers. It uses a math coprocessor, if present, but does not require one. Code output may be directed to a printer or disk files. 25 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA). Div. of Safety Issue Resolution; Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
USNRC; Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6014413
Report Number(s):
NUREG/CR-5656; PNL-7510
ON: TI91009645; TRN: 91-012105
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CONTROL ROOMS; VENTILATION SYSTEMS; E CODES; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; TOXIC MATERIALS; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; AIR FLOW; COMPUTER PROGRAM DOCUMENTATION; FORTRAN; GASEOUS WASTES; GAUSSIAN PROCESSES; HEALTH HAZARDS; INDOOR AIR POLLUTION; LIQUID WASTES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; RADIOACTIVE CLOUDS; SPACE DEPENDENCE; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; THEORETICAL DATA; TIME DEPENDENCE; AIR POLLUTION; CLOUDS; COMPUTER CODES; DATA; DISTRIBUTION; FLUID FLOW; GAS FLOW; HAZARDS; INFORMATION; MASS TRANSFER; MATERIALS; NUMERICAL DATA; POLLUTION; PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES; WASTES; 540130* - Environment, Atmospheric- Radioactive Materials Monitoring & Transport- (1990-); 540120 - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Ramsdell, J.V. EXTRAN: A computer code for estimating concentrations of toxic substances at control room air intakes. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Ramsdell, J.V. EXTRAN: A computer code for estimating concentrations of toxic substances at control room air intakes. United States.
Ramsdell, J.V. Fri . "EXTRAN: A computer code for estimating concentrations of toxic substances at control room air intakes". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6014413,
title = {EXTRAN: A computer code for estimating concentrations of toxic substances at control room air intakes},
author = {Ramsdell, J.V.},
abstractNote = {This report presents the NRC staff with a tool for assessing the potential effects of accidental releases of radioactive materials and toxic substances on habitability of nuclear facility control rooms. The tool is a computer code that estimates concentrations at nuclear facility control room air intakes given information about the release and the environmental conditions. The name of the computer code is EXTRAN. EXTRAN combines procedures for estimating the amount of airborne material, a Gaussian puff dispersion model, and the most recent algorithms for estimating diffusion coefficients in building wakes. It is a modular computer code, written in FORTRAN-77, that runs on personal computers. It uses a math coprocessor, if present, but does not require one. Code output may be directed to a printer or disk files. 25 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1991},
month = {Fri Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1991}
}

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