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Title: The late occurrence of urinary tract damage in patients successfully treated by radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma

Abstract

Urinary tract complications apparently resulting from radiation therapy for carcinoma of the cervix can occur as long as 30 years after cessation of such treatment. Patients generally present with urinary incontinence and often are treated by standard operative methods that usually are unsuccessful. Incontinence is related to bladder fibrosis, urethral nonfunction and vesicovaginal fistuLa formation, and may be accompanied by bilateral ureteral obstruction. Of 11 patients with late complications of radiotherapy 4 had upper tract deterioration, 4 had vesicovaginal fistulas, 5 had an incompetent urethra aNd 9 had a fibrotic, noncompliant areflexive bladder. Treatment was aimed at providing adequate low pressure storage capacity and consisted of augmentation cystoplasty in 5 patients, repair of the fistula in 4 and correction of urethral dysfunction in 5. Women who complain of incontinence and/or irritable bladder symptoms with a history of radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma should be evaluated for fistuLa formation, urethral incompetence, and detrusor areflexia and fibrosis before treatment is done.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5928440
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Urol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 141:6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; BLADDER; DELAYED RADIATION EFFECTS; CARCINOMAS; RADIOTHERAPY; SIDE EFFECTS; UTERUS; PATIENTS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; BODY; DISEASES; FEMALE GENITALS; MEDICINE; NEOPLASMS; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ORGANS; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIOLOGY; THERAPY; URINARY TRACT 560151* -- Radiation Effects on Animals-- Man

Citation Formats

Zoubek, J., McGuire, E.J., Noll, F., and DeLancey, J.O.. The late occurrence of urinary tract damage in patients successfully treated by radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Zoubek, J., McGuire, E.J., Noll, F., & DeLancey, J.O.. The late occurrence of urinary tract damage in patients successfully treated by radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma. United States.
Zoubek, J., McGuire, E.J., Noll, F., and DeLancey, J.O.. 1989. "The late occurrence of urinary tract damage in patients successfully treated by radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5928440,
title = {The late occurrence of urinary tract damage in patients successfully treated by radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma},
author = {Zoubek, J. and McGuire, E.J. and Noll, F. and DeLancey, J.O.},
abstractNote = {Urinary tract complications apparently resulting from radiation therapy for carcinoma of the cervix can occur as long as 30 years after cessation of such treatment. Patients generally present with urinary incontinence and often are treated by standard operative methods that usually are unsuccessful. Incontinence is related to bladder fibrosis, urethral nonfunction and vesicovaginal fistuLa formation, and may be accompanied by bilateral ureteral obstruction. Of 11 patients with late complications of radiotherapy 4 had upper tract deterioration, 4 had vesicovaginal fistulas, 5 had an incompetent urethra aNd 9 had a fibrotic, noncompliant areflexive bladder. Treatment was aimed at providing adequate low pressure storage capacity and consisted of augmentation cystoplasty in 5 patients, repair of the fistula in 4 and correction of urethral dysfunction in 5. Women who complain of incontinence and/or irritable bladder symptoms with a history of radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma should be evaluated for fistuLa formation, urethral incompetence, and detrusor areflexia and fibrosis before treatment is done.},
doi = {},
journal = {J. Urol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 141:6,
place = {United States},
year = 1989,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To investigate the clinical factors independently predictive of long-term severe urinary sequelae after postprostatectomy radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Between 1993 and 2005, 742 consecutive patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy with either adjuvant (n = 556; median radiation dose, 70.2 Gy) or salvage (n = 186; median radiation dose, 72 Gy) intent. Results: After a median follow-up of 99 months, the 8-year risk of Grade 2 or greater and Grade 3 late urinary toxicity was almost identical (23.9% vs. 23.7% and 12% vs. 10%) in the adjuvant and salvage cohorts, respectively. On univariate analysis, acute toxicity was significantly predictive of latemore » Grade 2 or greater sequelae in both subgroups (p <.0001 in both cases), and hypertension (p = .02) and whole-pelvis radiotherapy (p = .02) correlated significantly in the adjuvant cohort only. The variables predictive of late Grade 3 sequelae were acute Grade 2 or greater toxicity in both groups and whole-pelvis radiotherapy (8-year risk of Grade 3 events, 21% vs. 11%, p = .007), hypertension (8-year risk, 18% vs. 10%, p = .005), age {<=} 62 years at RT (8-year risk, 16% vs. 11%, p = .04) in the adjuvant subset, and radiation dose >72 Gy (8-year risk, 19% vs. 6%, p = .007) and age >71 years (8-year risk, 16% vs. 6%, p = .006) in the salvage subgroup. Multivariate analysis confirmed the independent predictive role of all the covariates indicated as statistically significant on univariate analysis. Conclusions: The risk of late Grade 2 or greater and Grade 3 urinary toxicity was almost identical, regardless of the RT intent. In the salvage cohort, older age and greater radiation doses resulted in a worse toxicity profile, and younger, hypertensive patients experienced a greater rate of severe late sequelae in the adjuvant setting. The causes of this latter correlation and apparently different etiopathogenesis of chronic damage in the two subgroups were unclear and deserve additional investigation.« less
  • In an 11-year study done at the Ottawa Civic Hospital, cytologic assessment of 323 patients treated by radiotherapy for invasive cervical carcinoma was reviewed. The value and limitations of gynecologic cytology in the follow-up of these patients are discussed.
  • Purpose: The protein CD24 is a cell surface protein that appears to function as an adhesion molecule; its expression has been shown to correlate with prognosis in a variety of tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunoreactivity of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma to CD24 and determine whether CD24 is associated with clinical and pathologic parameters, including prognosis. Methods and Materials: The expression of CD24 protein was immunohistochemically studied in 73 cases of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. All patients were treated with definitive radiotherapy alone or with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Two pathologists independently analyzed the immunostaining;more » they did not have knowledge of the patient outcomes and evaluated any changes according to the percentage of tumor cells stained as follows: negative, <5% reactive; and positive, >5% reactive. Results: Positive staining was found in 43 cases (58.9%). The immunoreactivity did not correlate with age, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, lymph node metastasis, or tumor size. For patients who were CD24 negative, the total failure and distant metastasis rates were decreased about 20% compared with the rates for patients who were CD24 positive. On univariate analysis, the 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rate of CD24-negative patients was significantly greater than that of the CD24-positive patients (84.7% vs. 66.7%, respectively, p = 0.0497). The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and CD24 expression were significantly associated with distant metastasis-free survival on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: CD24 expression was a significant independent prognostic factor for distant metastasis-free survival in patients with uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. In the future, prospective determination of CD24 expression might aid clinical practice in the selection of the appropriate therapy for individual patients.« less