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Title: Landfill gas recovery

Abstract

This facility describes a project that began four years ago as an effort to control odor, but has since grown into the Northeast's largest landfill gas-to-electricity power project. A series of wells and miles of pipe snaking beneath the ground channel gas to the power plant. When operating at capacity, the Northeast Landfill Power Project in Rhode Island can produce 12.3 megawatts of electricity for sale enough to power about 17,500 households. Landfill gas (LFG) is produced naturally as organic solid waste decomposes. Typically, LFG consists of methane (50 to 55 percent), carbon dioxide (45 to 50 percent),a nd small amounts of nitrogen, oxygen and various trace elements. Left uncontrolled, LFG will migrate out of a landfill and into the atmosphere, creating odor, safety and environmental problems.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5925151
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: BioCycle; (United States); Journal Volume: 32:8
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; METHANE; BIOSYNTHESIS; MUNICIPAL WASTES; BIODEGRADATION; ELECTRICITY; ENERGY CONSERVATION; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; ODOR; RHODE ISLAND; SANITARY LANDFILLS; ALKANES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DECOMPOSITION; HYDROCARBONS; MANAGEMENT; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANOLEPTIC PROPERTIES; POWER PLANTS; SYNTHESIS; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTES 090900* -- Biomass Fuels-- Processing-- (1990-)

Citation Formats

MacDonald, A. Landfill gas recovery. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
MacDonald, A. Landfill gas recovery. United States.
MacDonald, A. 1991. "Landfill gas recovery". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5925151,
title = {Landfill gas recovery},
author = {MacDonald, A.},
abstractNote = {This facility describes a project that began four years ago as an effort to control odor, but has since grown into the Northeast's largest landfill gas-to-electricity power project. A series of wells and miles of pipe snaking beneath the ground channel gas to the power plant. When operating at capacity, the Northeast Landfill Power Project in Rhode Island can produce 12.3 megawatts of electricity for sale enough to power about 17,500 households. Landfill gas (LFG) is produced naturally as organic solid waste decomposes. Typically, LFG consists of methane (50 to 55 percent), carbon dioxide (45 to 50 percent),a nd small amounts of nitrogen, oxygen and various trace elements. Left uncontrolled, LFG will migrate out of a landfill and into the atmosphere, creating odor, safety and environmental problems.},
doi = {},
journal = {BioCycle; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 32:8,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month = 8
}
  • Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LFG emissions are measured at an abandoned landfill with highly organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mean headspace and vent emissions are 0.240 and 0.074 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At sites with high food waste content, LFG generation drops rapidly after site closure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The viability of LFG recovery for CDMs in developing countries is doubtful. - Abstract: This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conductedmore » and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH{sub 4} flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188 {+-} 0.014, 0.224 {+-} 0.012 and 0.237 {+-} 0.008 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m{sup 2} hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06-0.89 l/m{sup 2} hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42-2.46 l/m{sup 2} hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L{sub 0}) values in the range of 19.8-102.6 m{sup 3}/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.« less
  • The establishment of the Bradley West Sanitary Landfill in California is described. The development of a drain plain in the old gravel pit was necessary to protect ground water supplies. The sides of the site were benched to contain any leachate within the fill. PLans to recover methane from the site within 60 days are briefly described. Details on the operation and monitoring of the site are given. (MCW)
  • Brooklyn Union Gas Co. is conducting field tests at New York City's Fresh Kills Landfill on Staten Island to determine the feasibility of recovering methane gas produced by anaerobic digestion of the thousands of tons of municipal waste buried at the site. The Staten Island project comprises two phases: (1) selection of well sites and development and installation of gas-recovery equipment; and (2) a study of the extent of the resource base, the cost of recovering and processing it, and the potential uses for the gas. According to Brooklyn Union, New York's eight major landfills could supply as much asmore » 6.5 billion CF/yr of methane. Despite the lack of empirical data on gas formation and production from landfills, the commercial production and pipeline sale of 1 million CF/day of gas at a landfill in California is an encouraging indication to proponents of the development of this resource.« less