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Title: Variable-reluctance motors for electric vehicle propulsion

Abstract

This paper discusses the design, operation, and expected performance of a 60-kW variable-reluctance motor and inverter-designed for electric vehicle propulsion. To substantiate the performance of this system, experimental data obtained with a prototype 3.8-kW motor and inverter are provided.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5761289
Report Number(s):
TP-850201
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; ELECTRIC MOTORS; DESIGN; OPERATION; PERFORMANCE TESTING; ELECTRIC-POWERED VEHICLES; INVERTERS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; POWER RANGE 1-10 KW; POWER RANGE 10-100 KW; DATA; ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT; EQUIPMENT; INFORMATION; MOTORS; NUMERICAL DATA; TESTING; VEHICLES 330300* -- Advanced Propulsion Systems-- Electric-Powered Systems

Citation Formats

Vallese, F.J., and Lang, J.H.. Variable-reluctance motors for electric vehicle propulsion. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Vallese, F.J., & Lang, J.H.. Variable-reluctance motors for electric vehicle propulsion. United States.
Vallese, F.J., and Lang, J.H.. 1985. "Variable-reluctance motors for electric vehicle propulsion". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5761289,
title = {Variable-reluctance motors for electric vehicle propulsion},
author = {Vallese, F.J. and Lang, J.H.},
abstractNote = {This paper discusses the design, operation, and expected performance of a 60-kW variable-reluctance motor and inverter-designed for electric vehicle propulsion. To substantiate the performance of this system, experimental data obtained with a prototype 3.8-kW motor and inverter are provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1985,
month = 1
}

Book:
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  • Variable switched reluctance (VSR) motors are gaining importance for industrial applications. The paper will introduce a novel approach to simplify the computation involved in the control of VSR motors. Results are shown, that validate the approach and demonstrates the superior performance compared to tabulated control parameters with linear interpolation, which are widely used in implementations.
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