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Title: Characteristics of frozen colostrum thawed in a microwave oven

Abstract

Use of a microwave oven to thaw frozen colostrum was evaluated. Colostrum was collected from nine cows, four of which were immunized to produce specific colostral antibodies. Colostrum from each cow was frozen, subsequently thawed, and pooled. One-liter aliquots of the pooled colostrum were frozen and assigned randomly to three thawing treatments. Colostrum was thawed using one of three regimens: 10 min in a microwave oven at full power (650 W), 17 min in a microwave oven at half power (325 W), and 25 min in 45 degrees C water. Colostrum thawed in the microwave oven was slightly coagulated and had lower volume and total protein content than colostrum thawed in water. Casein and pH were not different among treatments. Both concentration and total content of immunoglobulin A were higher in the control than in microwave treatments. Neither amount nor concentration of immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M were different among treatments. Immunological activity, measured by a hemolytic test, was lower for microwave treatments than the control but did not differ between microwave treatments. Frozen colostrum thawed in a microwave oven should provide a reasonable source of colostrum when fresh high quality colostrum is not available.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Illinois, Urbana
OSTI Identifier:
5749441
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Dairy Sci.; (United States); Journal Volume: 70:9
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; MICROWAVE RADIATION; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; MILK; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; THAWING; CATTLE; FREEZING; IMMUNOGLOBULINS; PREGNANCY; PROTEINS; ANIMALS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BODY FLUIDS; DOMESTIC ANIMALS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; FOOD; GLOBULINS; MAMMALS; MATERIALS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; RADIATIONS; RUMINANTS; VERTEBRATES; 560400* - Other Environmental Pollutant Effects

Citation Formats

Jones, L.R., Taylor, A.W., and Hines, H.C. Characteristics of frozen colostrum thawed in a microwave oven. United States: N. p., 1987. Web. doi:10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(87)80235-7.
Jones, L.R., Taylor, A.W., & Hines, H.C. Characteristics of frozen colostrum thawed in a microwave oven. United States. doi:10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(87)80235-7.
Jones, L.R., Taylor, A.W., and Hines, H.C. 1987. "Characteristics of frozen colostrum thawed in a microwave oven". United States. doi:10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(87)80235-7.
@article{osti_5749441,
title = {Characteristics of frozen colostrum thawed in a microwave oven},
author = {Jones, L.R. and Taylor, A.W. and Hines, H.C.},
abstractNote = {Use of a microwave oven to thaw frozen colostrum was evaluated. Colostrum was collected from nine cows, four of which were immunized to produce specific colostral antibodies. Colostrum from each cow was frozen, subsequently thawed, and pooled. One-liter aliquots of the pooled colostrum were frozen and assigned randomly to three thawing treatments. Colostrum was thawed using one of three regimens: 10 min in a microwave oven at full power (650 W), 17 min in a microwave oven at half power (325 W), and 25 min in 45 degrees C water. Colostrum thawed in the microwave oven was slightly coagulated and had lower volume and total protein content than colostrum thawed in water. Casein and pH were not different among treatments. Both concentration and total content of immunoglobulin A were higher in the control than in microwave treatments. Neither amount nor concentration of immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M were different among treatments. Immunological activity, measured by a hemolytic test, was lower for microwave treatments than the control but did not differ between microwave treatments. Frozen colostrum thawed in a microwave oven should provide a reasonable source of colostrum when fresh high quality colostrum is not available.},
doi = {10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(87)80235-7},
journal = {J. Dairy Sci.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 70:9,
place = {United States},
year = 1987,
month = 9
}
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