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Title: Tissue tropism of simian immunodeficiency virus in rhesus monkeys

Abstract

Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is a T-lymphotropic lentivirus that is genetically, immunologically, and morphologically related to the human immunodeficiency viruses type 1 and 2 (HIV-1, HIV-2). In rhesus monkeys, SIV induces a progressively fatal immunodeficiency syndrome strikingly similar to human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The tissue and cellular tropism of SIV was determined by immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization using a 3.48 kilobase SIV envelope gene probe labeled with biotin, {sup 35}S, or {sup 3}H. Probes labeled with {sup 35}S nonspecifically bound to tissue eosinophils and produced poor signal resolution compared to tritium labeled probes. Biotin labeled probes did not detect SIV under similar hybridization conditions. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues produced strong hybridization signal with superior morphology compared to frozen tissues. Gastrointestinal, respiratory, and lymphoid tissues most frequently contained SIV RNA. The distribution of SIV did not correlate with sex, or viral inoculum, but was most extensive in animals with SIV induced granulomatous encephalitis. SIV was most frequently observed in lymphocytes and macrophages. In the brain focal granulomas were composed almost entirely of EBM11+, lysozyme+, macrophages which contained large amounts of SIV RNA and p27 core protein detected by the monoclonal antibody R1C7. Cells away from granulomas in the brain parenchymamore » and around blood vessels contained virus and were compatible with oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Lymph nodes in follicular hyperplasia contained small numbers of SIV positive cells compatible with lymphocytes in the paracortex and mantle zones as well as in cells of the germinal center. Lymph nodes in various stages of follicular depletion with expanded paracortices contained large numbers of cells with SIV RNA in lymphocytes and macrophages.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
5733649
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5733649
Resource Type:
Miscellaneous
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Thesis (Ph. D.)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; AIDS; PATHOGENESIS; SIMIAN VIRUS; IMMUNOASSAY; BRAIN; LYMPHOCYTES; MACROPHAGES; MONKEYS; RNA; SULFUR 35; TRACER TECHNIQUES; TRITIUM COMPOUNDS; VIRAL DISEASES; ANIMAL CELLS; ANIMALS; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BIOASSAY; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BLOOD; BLOOD CELLS; BODY; BODY FLUIDS; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; DAYS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; DISEASES; EVEN-ODD NUCLEI; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; IMMUNE SYSTEM DISEASES; INFECTIOUS DISEASES; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; ISOTOPES; LEUKOCYTES; LIGHT NUCLEI; MAMMALS; MATERIALS; MICROORGANISMS; NERVOUS SYSTEM; NUCLEI; NUCLEIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; PARASITES; PHAGOCYTES; PRIMATES; RADIOISOTOPES; SOMATIC CELLS; SULFUR ISOTOPES; VERTEBRATES; VIRUSES 550901* -- Pathology-- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Wyand, M.S.. Tissue tropism of simian immunodeficiency virus in rhesus monkeys. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Wyand, M.S.. Tissue tropism of simian immunodeficiency virus in rhesus monkeys. United States.
Wyand, M.S.. Sun . "Tissue tropism of simian immunodeficiency virus in rhesus monkeys". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5733649,
title = {Tissue tropism of simian immunodeficiency virus in rhesus monkeys},
author = {Wyand, M.S.},
abstractNote = {Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is a T-lymphotropic lentivirus that is genetically, immunologically, and morphologically related to the human immunodeficiency viruses type 1 and 2 (HIV-1, HIV-2). In rhesus monkeys, SIV induces a progressively fatal immunodeficiency syndrome strikingly similar to human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The tissue and cellular tropism of SIV was determined by immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization using a 3.48 kilobase SIV envelope gene probe labeled with biotin, {sup 35}S, or {sup 3}H. Probes labeled with {sup 35}S nonspecifically bound to tissue eosinophils and produced poor signal resolution compared to tritium labeled probes. Biotin labeled probes did not detect SIV under similar hybridization conditions. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues produced strong hybridization signal with superior morphology compared to frozen tissues. Gastrointestinal, respiratory, and lymphoid tissues most frequently contained SIV RNA. The distribution of SIV did not correlate with sex, or viral inoculum, but was most extensive in animals with SIV induced granulomatous encephalitis. SIV was most frequently observed in lymphocytes and macrophages. In the brain focal granulomas were composed almost entirely of EBM11+, lysozyme+, macrophages which contained large amounts of SIV RNA and p27 core protein detected by the monoclonal antibody R1C7. Cells away from granulomas in the brain parenchyma and around blood vessels contained virus and were compatible with oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Lymph nodes in follicular hyperplasia contained small numbers of SIV positive cells compatible with lymphocytes in the paracortex and mantle zones as well as in cells of the germinal center. Lymph nodes in various stages of follicular depletion with expanded paracortices contained large numbers of cells with SIV RNA in lymphocytes and macrophages.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1989},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1989}
}

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