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Title: Rise and fall of diesel cars; A consumer choice analysis

Abstract

The search for alternative transportation fuels must be undertaken with an understanding of the retail markets for vehicles and fuels. The authors of this paper examine the history of the diesel car, as the only important alternative to gasoline in the U.S. household vehicle market, with the specific intent of exploring the conditions under which individuals would purchase a nongasoline vehicle. Diesel car sales rose from less than 1 percent of new car sales in 1976 to 6 percent by 1981, and then collapsed to less than 1 percent by 1985. A survey of diesel car owners was conducted in California to determine why diesel car sales rose and fell so sharply. The rise of diesel car sales was fueled by expected fuel cost savings. However, it was found that consumers relied on per gallon fuel prices, not per mile fuel costs or fully allocated total costs as the indicator of whether diesel cars were economically superior.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (Univ. of California-Davis, CA (US))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5661962
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Transportation Research Record; (United States); Journal Volume: 1175
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; AUTOMOBILES; DIESEL ENGINES; COST; PUBLIC OPINION; USA; FUEL SUBSTITUTION; TRANSPORTATION SECTOR; AUTOMOTIVE FUELS; DIESEL FUELS; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; ENERGY SOURCES; ENGINES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; GAS OILS; HEAT ENGINES; INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES; LIQUID FUELS; NORTH AMERICA; PETROLEUM; PETROLEUM FRACTIONS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; VEHICLES 330102* -- Internal Combustion Engines-- Diesel; 320203 -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- Transportation-- Land & Roadway

Citation Formats

Kurani, K.S., and Sperling, D.. Rise and fall of diesel cars; A consumer choice analysis. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Kurani, K.S., & Sperling, D.. Rise and fall of diesel cars; A consumer choice analysis. United States.
Kurani, K.S., and Sperling, D.. 1988. "Rise and fall of diesel cars; A consumer choice analysis". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5661962,
title = {Rise and fall of diesel cars; A consumer choice analysis},
author = {Kurani, K.S. and Sperling, D.},
abstractNote = {The search for alternative transportation fuels must be undertaken with an understanding of the retail markets for vehicles and fuels. The authors of this paper examine the history of the diesel car, as the only important alternative to gasoline in the U.S. household vehicle market, with the specific intent of exploring the conditions under which individuals would purchase a nongasoline vehicle. Diesel car sales rose from less than 1 percent of new car sales in 1976 to 6 percent by 1981, and then collapsed to less than 1 percent by 1985. A survey of diesel car owners was conducted in California to determine why diesel car sales rose and fell so sharply. The rise of diesel car sales was fueled by expected fuel cost savings. However, it was found that consumers relied on per gallon fuel prices, not per mile fuel costs or fully allocated total costs as the indicator of whether diesel cars were economically superior.},
doi = {},
journal = {Transportation Research Record; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 1175,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 1
}
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