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Title: Tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 as mediators of endotoxin-induced beneficial effects

Abstract

Bacterial lipopolysaccharides or endotoxins are known to induce tumor necrosis; enhanced nonspecific resistance to bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections and to radiation sickness; and tolerance to lethal doses of endotoxin. These beneficial effects are achieved by pretreatment with minute amounts of endotoxin. Recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 1 (IL-1) are among the mediators capable of invoking radioprotection or resistance to the consequences of cecal ligation and puncture. Both cytokines are potent inducers of serum colony-stimulating factor (CSF) in C3H/HeJ mice (low responders to endotoxin). The number of splenic granulocyte-macrophage precursors was found to increase 5 days after injection of TNF in these mice. Although with IL-1 no increase in the number of granulocyte-macrophage colonies occurred in culture in the presence of serum CSF, a marked stimulation was observed when TNF was added. This stimulation of myelopoiesis observed in vivo and in vitro may be related to the radioprotective effect of TNF. The data presented suggest that TNF and IL-1 released after injection of endotoxin participate in the mediation of endotoxin-induced enhancement of nonspecific resistance and stimulation of hematopoiesis. 76 references.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Heidelberg, Germany, F.R.
OSTI Identifier:
5650051
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Rev. Infect. Dis.; (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ENDOTOXINS; RADIOSENSITIVITY EFFECTS; LYMPHOKINES; COLONY FORMATION; MACROPHAGES; MICE; RADIATION PROTECTION; SEPTICEMIA; ANIMAL CELLS; ANIMALS; ANTIGENS; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; GROWTH FACTORS; MAMMALS; MATERIALS; MITOGENS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PHAGOCYTES; PROTEINS; RODENTS; SOMATIC CELLS; TOXIC MATERIALS; TOXINS; VERTEBRATES; 560152* - Radiation Effects on Animals- Animals

Citation Formats

Urbaschek, R., and Urbaschek, B. Tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 as mediators of endotoxin-induced beneficial effects. United States: N. p., 1987. Web. doi:10.1093/clinids/9.Supplement_5.S607.
Urbaschek, R., & Urbaschek, B. Tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 as mediators of endotoxin-induced beneficial effects. United States. doi:10.1093/clinids/9.Supplement_5.S607.
Urbaschek, R., and Urbaschek, B. 1987. "Tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 as mediators of endotoxin-induced beneficial effects". United States. doi:10.1093/clinids/9.Supplement_5.S607.
@article{osti_5650051,
title = {Tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 as mediators of endotoxin-induced beneficial effects},
author = {Urbaschek, R. and Urbaschek, B.},
abstractNote = {Bacterial lipopolysaccharides or endotoxins are known to induce tumor necrosis; enhanced nonspecific resistance to bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections and to radiation sickness; and tolerance to lethal doses of endotoxin. These beneficial effects are achieved by pretreatment with minute amounts of endotoxin. Recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 1 (IL-1) are among the mediators capable of invoking radioprotection or resistance to the consequences of cecal ligation and puncture. Both cytokines are potent inducers of serum colony-stimulating factor (CSF) in C3H/HeJ mice (low responders to endotoxin). The number of splenic granulocyte-macrophage precursors was found to increase 5 days after injection of TNF in these mice. Although with IL-1 no increase in the number of granulocyte-macrophage colonies occurred in culture in the presence of serum CSF, a marked stimulation was observed when TNF was added. This stimulation of myelopoiesis observed in vivo and in vitro may be related to the radioprotective effect of TNF. The data presented suggest that TNF and IL-1 released after injection of endotoxin participate in the mediation of endotoxin-induced enhancement of nonspecific resistance and stimulation of hematopoiesis. 76 references.},
doi = {10.1093/clinids/9.Supplement_5.S607},
journal = {Rev. Infect. Dis.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1987,
month = 9
}
  • Interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are molecularly distinct cytokines acting on separate receptors. The release of these cytokines can be concomitantly induced by the same signal and from the same cellular source, suggesting that they may cooperate. Administered alone, human recombinant (hr)IL-1 alpha and hrTNF alpha protect lethally irradiated mice from death, whereas murine recombinant GM-CSF and hrG-CSF do not confer similar protection. On a dose basis, IL-1 alpha is a more efficient radioprotector than TNF alpha. At optimal doses, IL-1 alpha is a more radioprotectivemore » cytokine than TNF alpha in C57BL/6 and B6D2F1 mice and less effective than TNF alpha in C3H/HeN mice, suggesting that the relative effectiveness of TNF alpha and IL-1 alpha depends on the genetic makeup of the host. Administration of the two cytokines in combination results in additive radioprotection in all three strains. This suggests that the two cytokines act through different radioprotective pathways and argues against their apparent redundancy. Suboptimal, nonradioprotective doses of IL-1 alpha also synergize with GM-CSF or G-CSF to confer optimal radioprotection, suggesting that such an interaction may be necessary for radioprotection of hemopoietic progenitor cells.« less
  • Total-body irradiation (TBI) induces an increase in levels of granulocytes and cortisol in blood. To explore the underlying mechanisms, we studied 26 patients who had TBI prior to bone marrow transplantation. Our findings suggest that only a high dose of TBI (10 Gy) was capable of activating the hypothalamopituitary area since corticotropin-releasing factor and blood adrenocorticotropic hormone levels increased at the end of the TBI. There was a concomitant increase in the levels of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor in blood, suggesting that these cytokines might activate the hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal axis. Interleukin 1 was not detected. Since vascular injurymore » is a common after radiation treatment, it is possible that interleukin 6 was secreted by endothelial cells. The exact mechanisms of the production of cyctokines induced by ionizing radiation remain to be determined. 25 refs., 1 fig.« less
  • Binding of peptide hormones to surface membrane receptors leads to the transcription of specific genes within relevant target cells. How these signals are transduced to alter gene expression is largely unknown, but this mechanism probably involves a sequence of enzymatic steps that activate factors in the nucleus that modulate transcription. The authors demonstrate that two different peptide hormones, or cytokines, stimulate the human immunodeficiency virus enhancer, and this effect is mediated by nuclear factor (NF) {kappa}B. These cytokines, tumor necrosis factor {alpha} and interleukin 1, act on multiple cell types and represent the only naturally occurring activators of this transcriptionmore » factor among eight cytokines examined. Although NF-{kappa}B binding can be stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, tumor necrosis factor {alpha} acts through an independent mechanism, inducing NF-{kappa}B binding in HT-2 cells, which did not show increased binding in response to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and causing superinduction in Jurkat T-lymphoma cells. These findings suggest that human immunodeficiency virus gene expression can be induced in T cells without activating lymphokine secretion and that the role of these cytokines in the activation of latent human immunodeficiency virus infection deserves further clinical evaluation. Finally, this link between binding at the surface membrane and stimulation of a specific transcription factor should help define intermediates for these cytokine activation pathways.« less
  • The biosynthesis and processing of cachetin/tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were examined in the murine macrophage-like cell line RAW 264.7. Lipipolysaccharide-stimulated cells secreted both glycosylated and nonglycosylated 17-kilodalton (kDa) mature cachectin/TNF into the culture medium. Secreted cachectin/TNF was derived from membrane-associated precursors that were precipitated by polyclonal antisera raised against either the mature protein or synthetic peptide fragments of the 79 amino acid cachectin/TNF prohormone sequence. About half of the precursors were N-glycosylated, apparently cotranslationally. The cachectin/TNF precursors were then proteolytically cleaved to release soluble mature cytokine into the medium, while the membrane-bound 14-kDa prosequence remained cell associated. During the periodmore » of LPS stimulation, the amount of macrophage cell surface cachectin/TNF remained at a low level, suggesting that both nonglycosylated and glycosylated precursors of cachectin/TNF are efficiently cleaved by these cells. These findings suggest the presence of a unique mechanism for the secretion of cachectin/TNF.« less
  • Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), in addition to being cytotoxic for certain tumor cells, has turned out as a multifunctional cytokine that is involved in the regulation of immunity and inflammation. Since human keratinocytes have been demonstrated to be a potent source of various cytokines, it was investigated whether epidermal cells synthesize and release TNF-alpha. Supernatants derived from normal human keratinocytes (HNK) and human epidermoid carcinoma cell lines (KB, A431) were tested both in a TNF-alpha-specific ELISA and a bioassay. In supernatants of untreated epidermal cells, no or minimal TNF-alpha activity was found, while after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) ormore » ultraviolet (UV) light, significant amounts were detected. Western blot analysis using an antibody directed against human TNF-alpha revealed a molecular mass of 17 kD for keratinocyte-derived TNF-alpha. These biological and biochemical data were also confirmed by Northern blot analysis revealing mRNA specific for TNF-alpha in LPS- or ultraviolet B (UVB)-treated HNK and KB cells. In addition, increased TNF-alpha levels were detected in the serum obtained from human volunteers 12 and 24 h after a single total body UVB exposure, which caused a severe sunburn reaction. These findings indicate that keratinocytes upon stimulation are able to synthesize and release TNF-alpha, which may gain access to the circulation. Thus, TNF-alpha in concert with other epidermal cell-derived cytokines may mediate local and systemic inflammatory reactions during host defense against injurious events caused by microbial agents or UV irradiation.« less