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Title: Cellular immune mechanisms in Coxsackievirus group B, type 3 induced myocarditis in Balb/C mice

Abstract

Coxsackie B viruses are a common cause of viral myocarditis in humans. A murine model of the human disease has been developed using Coxsackievirus group B, type 3 and inbred Balb/c mice. Infection of T lymphocyte deficient mice does not result in significant myocarditis indicating the importance of T cells in this disease. The virus can be isolated from the hearts of T cell deficient and normal mice in equal concentrations. Virus elimination presumably is mediated by virus specific neutralizing antibody induced in both groups. T lymphocytes, natural killer cells and macrophage obtained from normal virus infected mice are all capable of lysing myofibers in vitro. Maximum lysis is obtained with the cytolytic T cells. When these cell populations or Coxsackievirus immune antibody were adoptively transferred into T lymphocyte deficient animals infected with the virus, only animals given T cells developed significant myocarditis.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Department of Pathology, University of Vermont, Burlington
OSTI Identifier:
5586816
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Adv. Exp. Med. Biol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 161
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; HEART; VIRAL DISEASES; VIRUSES; IMMUNE REACTIONS; LYMPHOCYTES; MICE; RADIATION CHIMERAS; ANIMAL CELLS; ANIMALS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BLOOD; BLOOD CELLS; BODY; BODY FLUIDS; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; CHIMERAS; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; DISEASES; INFECTIOUS DISEASES; LEUKOCYTES; MAMMALS; MATERIALS; MICROORGANISMS; MOSAICISM; ORGANS; PARASITES; RODENTS; SOMATIC CELLS; VERTEBRATES; 550900* - Pathology

Citation Formats

Huber, S.A., and Job, L.P. Cellular immune mechanisms in Coxsackievirus group B, type 3 induced myocarditis in Balb/C mice. United States: N. p., 1983. Web. doi:10.1007/978-1-4684-4472-8_29.
Huber, S.A., & Job, L.P. Cellular immune mechanisms in Coxsackievirus group B, type 3 induced myocarditis in Balb/C mice. United States. doi:10.1007/978-1-4684-4472-8_29.
Huber, S.A., and Job, L.P. Sat . "Cellular immune mechanisms in Coxsackievirus group B, type 3 induced myocarditis in Balb/C mice". United States. doi:10.1007/978-1-4684-4472-8_29.
@article{osti_5586816,
title = {Cellular immune mechanisms in Coxsackievirus group B, type 3 induced myocarditis in Balb/C mice},
author = {Huber, S.A. and Job, L.P.},
abstractNote = {Coxsackie B viruses are a common cause of viral myocarditis in humans. A murine model of the human disease has been developed using Coxsackievirus group B, type 3 and inbred Balb/c mice. Infection of T lymphocyte deficient mice does not result in significant myocarditis indicating the importance of T cells in this disease. The virus can be isolated from the hearts of T cell deficient and normal mice in equal concentrations. Virus elimination presumably is mediated by virus specific neutralizing antibody induced in both groups. T lymphocytes, natural killer cells and macrophage obtained from normal virus infected mice are all capable of lysing myofibers in vitro. Maximum lysis is obtained with the cytolytic T cells. When these cell populations or Coxsackievirus immune antibody were adoptively transferred into T lymphocyte deficient animals infected with the virus, only animals given T cells developed significant myocarditis.},
doi = {10.1007/978-1-4684-4472-8_29},
journal = {Adv. Exp. Med. Biol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 161,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1983},
month = {Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1983}
}
  • In adolescent CD-1 male mice inoculated with a myocarditic coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3m) acute focal lesions containing necrotic myocytes, infiltrating mononuclear cells, and fibroblasts develop. With the use of an in situ immune autoradiographic method with rat monoclonal antibodies (MAb) and an /sup 35/S-labeled antibody, viral antigens were detected outside of lesions. Macrophages, T lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells were identified within myocarditic lesions during the acute phase of the disease. Macrophages detected by anti-Mac-1 MAb were in focal areas within myocarditic lesions on Days 4-7 after inoculation. T lymphocytes were detected in myocarditic lesions on Days 4-10, with MAbmore » to Thy-1 and Lyt-1 antigens showing diffuse reaction patterns, suggesting random distribution of these cells in lesions. Focal areas of reactivity were detected with MAbs to L3T4 and Lyt-2 antigens, suggesting clusters of helper and cytotoxic/suppressor T lymphocytes, respectively. NK cells were presumptively detected by asialo GM1 surface marker in lesions at all times. The presence of activated NK cells in lesions was confirmed by assay of mechanically dissociated heart tissues on Day 8. These data describe the temporal sequence and identity of leukocytes entering into CVB3-induced focal myocarditic lesions during the acute phase of disease in CD-1 mice.« less
  • Viral myocarditis (VMC) is an inflammation of heart muscle in infants and young adolescents. This study explored the function of halofuginone (HF) in Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) -treated suckling mice. HF-treated animal exhibited higher survival rate, lower heart/body weight, and more decreased blood sugar concentration than CVB3 group. HF also reduced the expressions of interleukin(IL)-17 and IL-23 and the numbers of Th17 cells. Moreover, HF downregulated pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine levels. The expressions of transforming growth factor(TGF-β1) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B (NF-κB) p65/ tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) proteins were decreased by HF as well. Finally,more » the overexpression of TGF-β1 counteracted the protection effect of HF in CVB3-treated suckling mice. In summary, our study suggests HF increases the survival of CVB3 suckling mice, reduces the Th17 cells and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, and may through downregulation of the TGF-β1-mediated expression of NF-κB p65/TNF-α pathway proteins. These results offer a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of VMC. - Highlights: • Halofuginone (HF) increases the survival of suckling BALB/c mice infected with acute CVB3. • HF reduces the expression of Th17 cell markers (IL-17 and IL-23) and the number of CD4{sup +} IL17{sup +} cells. • Pro-inflammatory cytokines levels associated with myocarditis were reduced by HF in CVB3-treated suckling mice. • HF alleviates VMC via inhibition of TGF-β1-mediated NF-κB p65/TNF-α pathway.« less
  • Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) is one of the major cytokines that modulate the immune response in viral myocarditis, but its role has not yet been thoroughly evaluated. We antagonized TNF-{alpha} using the expressed soluble p75 TNF receptor linked to the Fc portion of the human IgG1 gene (sTNFR:Fc) by in vivo electroporation, and evaluated its effects on experimental coxsackieviral B3 (CVB3) myocarditis. A plasmid DNA encoding sTNFR:Fc (15 {mu}g/mouse) was injected into the gastrocnemius muscles of Balb/C male mice followed by electroporation (day -1). Control mice were injected with an empty vector. One day after electroporation, mice were infected withmore » CVB3 (day 0). Serum levels of sTNFR:Fc increased from day 2 and peaked at day 5 following electroporation. The heart virus titers of sTNFR:Fc mice were higher than those of controls at day 3. However, subsequent to day 12, the survival rates of the sTNFR:Fc mice were significantly higher than those of the controls (36% versus 0% at day 27, P < 0.01). Histopathological examination indicated that inflammation and myocardial fibrosis were significantly decreased in sTNFR:Fc mice at day 12. The expressed sTNFR:Fc could modulate the inflammatory process during the post-viremic phase of viral myocarditis.« less
  • Ultraviolet B irradiation (280 to 320 nm) of mice at the site of intradermal infection with herpes simplex virus type 2 increased the severity of the herpes simplex virus type 2 disease and decreased delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses to viral antigen. Decrease in DTH resulted from the induction of suppressor T cells, as evidenced by the ability of spleen cells from UV-irradiated mice to inhibit DTH and proliferative responses after adoptive transfer. Lymph node cells from UV-irradiated animals did not transfer suppression. DTH was suppressed at the induction but not the expression phase. Suppressor T cells were Lyt-1+, L3T4+, andmore » their activity was antigen-specific. However, after in vitro culture of spleen cells from UV-irradiated mice with herpes simplex virus type 2 antigen, suppressor activity was mediated by Lyt-2+ cells. Culture supernatants contained soluble nonantigen-specific suppressive factors.« less
  • Genetically susceptible BALB/c mice are refractory to further infection after recovery from Leishmania major infection after a sublethal dose of gamma-irradiation. In contrast, mice immunized with killed promastigotes s.c. develop exacerbated lesions after infection. Both groups of mice produce only a low level of specific antibody and no detectable cytotoxic T cells, but do have a strong antigen-specific DTH, which is adoptively transferable with Lyt-1+2-, L3T4+ T cells. Kinetic and histological studies revealed that mice immunized s.c. developed Jones-Mote hypersensitivity, peaking at 15 hr. with little mononuclear cell infiltration at the site of antigen administration; whereas mice that had recoveredmore » from infection developed tuberculin-type of reactivity, peaking at 24 to 48 hr, with intense mononuclear cell infiltration. Splenic T cells from recovered mice, when injected into the footpads of normal recipients together with live promastigotes, were able to retard lesion development; whereas T cells from s.c. immunized mice, when similarly transferred, accelerated disease progression. Antigen-specific culture supernatant of spleen cells from recovered mice also activated normal resident peritoneal macrophages to kill intracellular L. major amastigotes and tumor cells. Culture supernatants of spleen cells from s.c. immunized or normal mice were devoid of such activities. Part of the macrophage-activating potential can be inhibited by antibody specific for IFN-gamma. These results therefore demonstrate that whereas the Jones-Mote reaction is correlated with disease exacerbation, the tuberculin-type of DTH may be protective. Furthermore, in vivo immunity is directly related to the capacity of T cells to produce macrophage-activating factor.« less