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Title: The future of energy efficiency services in a competitive environment

Abstract

The competitive restructuring of the electric power industry raises fundamental strategic questions about how energy efficiency services can best be delivered. While some utilities believe that the ``commoditization`` of electric power will extinguish their role in providing efficiency services, others are committed to developing new ways of profitably delivering highly integrated service packages in a more competitive environment. In other industries that have undergone similar transitions, leading companies have prospered by developing new ``reintegration`` strategies to provide enhanced customer value. In the electric power sector, these strategies will bring to the fore finance and marketing skills, giving rise to far-reaching changes in the provision of energy services. Using market-based forward prices for electricity, power merchants may soon be able to ``monetize`` electricity savings and arbitrate against kilowatt-hour prices. Providers of efficiency services will be forced to develop new techniques for ``mass customization`` of service packages, incorporating features such as power quality management, innovative pricing, billing, and financial risk management. Technology integration will be a central task for these companies. As the transmission and distribution grid is permeated with real-time price information, the optimal technical solutions for the customer, including distributed generation, storage, and efficiency options, will become increasingly site-specific andmore » time-dependent.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
55561
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Other Information: DN: Strategic issues paper 4; PBD: 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ELECTRIC UTILITIES; LOAD MANAGEMENT; SERVICE SECTOR; FORECASTING; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; ORGANIZING; RATE STRUCTURE; COMPETITION

Citation Formats

Newcomb, J. The future of energy efficiency services in a competitive environment. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Newcomb, J. The future of energy efficiency services in a competitive environment. United States.
Newcomb, J. 1994. "The future of energy efficiency services in a competitive environment". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_55561,
title = {The future of energy efficiency services in a competitive environment},
author = {Newcomb, J.},
abstractNote = {The competitive restructuring of the electric power industry raises fundamental strategic questions about how energy efficiency services can best be delivered. While some utilities believe that the ``commoditization`` of electric power will extinguish their role in providing efficiency services, others are committed to developing new ways of profitably delivering highly integrated service packages in a more competitive environment. In other industries that have undergone similar transitions, leading companies have prospered by developing new ``reintegration`` strategies to provide enhanced customer value. In the electric power sector, these strategies will bring to the fore finance and marketing skills, giving rise to far-reaching changes in the provision of energy services. Using market-based forward prices for electricity, power merchants may soon be able to ``monetize`` electricity savings and arbitrate against kilowatt-hour prices. Providers of efficiency services will be forced to develop new techniques for ``mass customization`` of service packages, incorporating features such as power quality management, innovative pricing, billing, and financial risk management. Technology integration will be a central task for these companies. As the transmission and distribution grid is permeated with real-time price information, the optimal technical solutions for the customer, including distributed generation, storage, and efficiency options, will become increasingly site-specific and time-dependent.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month =
}

Book:
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