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Title: Growth of Legionella pneumophila in association with blue-green algae (Cyanobacteria)

Abstract

Legionella pneumophila (Legionnaires disease bacterium) of serogroup 1 was isolated from an algal-bacterial mat community growing at 45/sup 0/C in a man-made thermal effluent. This isolate was grown in mineral salts medium at 45/sup 0/C in association with the blue-green alga (cyanobacterium) Fischerella sp. over a pH range of 6.9 to 7.6. L. pneumophila was apparently using algal extracellular products as its carbon and energy sources. These observations indicate that the temperature, pH, and nutritional requirements of L. pneumophila are not as stringent as those previously observed when cultured on complex media. This association between L. pneumophila and certain blue-green algae suggests an explanation for the apparent widespread distribution of the bacterium in nature.

Authors:
 [1]; ; ;
  1. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5299857
DOE Contract Number:
AT(07-2)-1
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Appl. Environ. Microbiol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 39:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ALGAE; SYMBIOSIS; BACTERIA; GROWTH; CULTURE MEDIA; MEDIUM TEMPERATURE; PH VALUE; THERMAL EFFLUENTS; MICROORGANISMS; PLANTS 550700* -- Microbiology

Citation Formats

Tison, D.L., Pope, D.H., Cherry, W.B., and Fliermans, C.B. Growth of Legionella pneumophila in association with blue-green algae (Cyanobacteria). United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
Tison, D.L., Pope, D.H., Cherry, W.B., & Fliermans, C.B. Growth of Legionella pneumophila in association with blue-green algae (Cyanobacteria). United States.
Tison, D.L., Pope, D.H., Cherry, W.B., and Fliermans, C.B. 1980. "Growth of Legionella pneumophila in association with blue-green algae (Cyanobacteria)". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5299857,
title = {Growth of Legionella pneumophila in association with blue-green algae (Cyanobacteria)},
author = {Tison, D.L. and Pope, D.H. and Cherry, W.B. and Fliermans, C.B.},
abstractNote = {Legionella pneumophila (Legionnaires disease bacterium) of serogroup 1 was isolated from an algal-bacterial mat community growing at 45/sup 0/C in a man-made thermal effluent. This isolate was grown in mineral salts medium at 45/sup 0/C in association with the blue-green alga (cyanobacterium) Fischerella sp. over a pH range of 6.9 to 7.6. L. pneumophila was apparently using algal extracellular products as its carbon and energy sources. These observations indicate that the temperature, pH, and nutritional requirements of L. pneumophila are not as stringent as those previously observed when cultured on complex media. This association between L. pneumophila and certain blue-green algae suggests an explanation for the apparent widespread distribution of the bacterium in nature.},
doi = {},
journal = {Appl. Environ. Microbiol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 39:2,
place = {United States},
year = 1980,
month = 2
}
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