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Title: Precambrian and Mesozoic plate margins: Montana, Idaho and Wyoming with field guides for the 8th international conference on basement tectonics

Abstract

Two field trips held in conjunction with the 8th International Conference on Basement Tectonics are the raison d'etre for this volume, which would perhaps otherwise seem an eclectic association. The unifying theme is an investigation of the nature of plate margins in time and space, consonant with the main theme of the conference, Characterization and Comparison of Precambrian Through Mesozoic Continental Margins. Papers presented at the conference will be published in a separate volume by the International Basement Tectonics Association, Inc. The first field trip is at least a preliminary attempt at an overview of the Precambrian (predominantly Archean) crystalline basement of southwestern Montana. A number of interesting investigations have been focused on this region in recent years. Thus, papers in the first part of this volume take the reader from the Stillwater Complex across the Beartooth Plateau, to the northern borders of Yellowstone National Park on to the southern Madison Range, and finally to some of the western-most (probable) Archean exposures in the Highland Mountains south of Butte. Moving considerably forward on the geologic time scale, the other broad topic dealt with in a second field trip and complementary articles is a relatively recent collisional terrane in central Idahomore » and eastern Oregon. Examined are portions of the Idaho batholith and its enigmatic and fascinating marginal rocks, and to the west, the heart of the suture zone itself in the Wallowa-Seven Devils terrane with its group of exotic intrusive, metavolcanic, and metasedimentary rocks. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (eds.)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, Butte, MT (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE/ER
OSTI Identifier:
5296123
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/13962-1; CONF-8808218-Suppl.
ON: DE90002940
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-88ER13962
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 8. international conference on basement tectonics, Butte, MT (USA), Aug 1988; Related Information: Special publication 96
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; MONTANA; PLATE TECTONICS; EARTH CRUST; LEADING ABSTRACT; MESOZOIC ERA; PRECAMBRIAN ERA; ROCKS; TECTONICS; ABSTRACTS; DOCUMENT TYPES; FEDERAL REGION VIII; GEOLOGIC AGES; NORTH AMERICA; USA; 580000* - Geosciences

Citation Formats

Lewis, S.E., and Berg, R.B.. Precambrian and Mesozoic plate margins: Montana, Idaho and Wyoming with field guides for the 8th international conference on basement tectonics. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Lewis, S.E., & Berg, R.B.. Precambrian and Mesozoic plate margins: Montana, Idaho and Wyoming with field guides for the 8th international conference on basement tectonics. United States.
Lewis, S.E., and Berg, R.B.. 1988. "Precambrian and Mesozoic plate margins: Montana, Idaho and Wyoming with field guides for the 8th international conference on basement tectonics". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5296123,
title = {Precambrian and Mesozoic plate margins: Montana, Idaho and Wyoming with field guides for the 8th international conference on basement tectonics},
author = {Lewis, S.E. and Berg, R.B.},
abstractNote = {Two field trips held in conjunction with the 8th International Conference on Basement Tectonics are the raison d'etre for this volume, which would perhaps otherwise seem an eclectic association. The unifying theme is an investigation of the nature of plate margins in time and space, consonant with the main theme of the conference, Characterization and Comparison of Precambrian Through Mesozoic Continental Margins. Papers presented at the conference will be published in a separate volume by the International Basement Tectonics Association, Inc. The first field trip is at least a preliminary attempt at an overview of the Precambrian (predominantly Archean) crystalline basement of southwestern Montana. A number of interesting investigations have been focused on this region in recent years. Thus, papers in the first part of this volume take the reader from the Stillwater Complex across the Beartooth Plateau, to the northern borders of Yellowstone National Park on to the southern Madison Range, and finally to some of the western-most (probable) Archean exposures in the Highland Mountains south of Butte. Moving considerably forward on the geologic time scale, the other broad topic dealt with in a second field trip and complementary articles is a relatively recent collisional terrane in central Idaho and eastern Oregon. Examined are portions of the Idaho batholith and its enigmatic and fascinating marginal rocks, and to the west, the heart of the suture zone itself in the Wallowa-Seven Devils terrane with its group of exotic intrusive, metavolcanic, and metasedimentary rocks. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 7
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • The International Conference on Basement Tectonics was held in Butte, Montana, August 8--12,1988. Historically, basement tectonics conferences have focused on such topics as reactivation of faults, the influence of basement faults on metallogeny and hydrocarbon accumulation, and the use of geophysical and remote sensing techniques to interpret subsurface and surface geology. The 8th Conference diverged from past conferences in that a unifying theme was selected. Because ancient major terrane or cratonic boundaries are often postulated to be fault zones which are subsequently reactivated, the conference was organized to examine all aspects of ancient continental margins and terrane boundaries and tomore » compare younger (Mesozoic) ones, about which more is known, with older (Paleozoic and Precambrian) ones. Moreover, because the 8th Conference was held in the northwestern United States, a greater emphasis was placed on the Mesozoic margin of western North America and the North American shield. The seven oral sessions and four poster sessions all dealt with aspects of the conference theme: characterization and comparison of ancient continental margins. The papers will be indexed individually.« less
  • The International Conference on Basement Tectonics was held in Butte, Montana, August 8--12,1988. Historically, basement tectonics conferences have focused on such topics as reactivation of faults, the influence of basement faults on metallogeny and hydrocarbon accumulation, and the use of geophysical and remote sensing techniques to interpret subsurface and surface geology. The 8th Conference diverged from past conferences in that a unifying theme was selected. Because ancient major terrane or cratonic boundaries are often postulated to be fault zones which are subsequently reactivated, the conference was organized to examine all aspects of ancient continental margins and terrane boundaries and tomore » compare younger (Mesozoic) ones, about which more is known, with older (Paleozoic and Precambrian) ones. Moreover, because the 8th Conference was held in the northwestern United States, a greater emphasis was placed on the Mesozoic margin of western North America and the North American shield. The seven oral sessions and four poster sessions all dealt with aspects of the conference theme: characterization and comparison of ancient continental margins. The papers will be indexed individually.« less
  • Most models for the tectonic evolution of New Guinea involve Early and Late Miocene arc-continent collisions, creating an orogenic belt. Structural trends and prospectivity are then analyzed in terms of belts across the country; the Fold Belt (with the discovered oil and gas fields), the Mobile Belt and the accreted arcs. This model inhibits realistic assessment of prospectivity. It now appears the Mobile Belt formed by Oligocene compression then by Early Miocene extension, related to slab-rollback, that unroofed metamorphic core complexes adjacent to starved half-grabens. The grabens filled in the Middle Miocene and were largely transported intact during the Pliocenemore » arc-collision. Early Miocene reefs and hypothesized starved basin source rocks create a viable play throughout northern New Guinea as in the Salawati Basin. The Pliocene clastic section is locally prospective due to overthrusting and deep burial. Within the Fold Belt, the site and types of oil and gas fields are largely controlled by the basement architecture. This controlled the transfer zones and depocentres during Mesozoic extension and the location of major basement uplifts during compression. In PNG, the Bosavi lineament separates an oil province from a gas province. In Irian Jaya the transition from a relatively competent sequence to a rifted sequence west of [approx]139[degrees]E may also be a gas-oil province boundary. Understanding, in detail, the compartmentalization of inverted blocks and areas of thin-skinned thrusting, controlled by the basement architecture, will help constrain hydrocarbon prospectivity.« less
  • Most models for the tectonic evolution of New Guinea involve Early and Late Miocene arc-continent collisions, creating an orogenic belt. Structural trends and prospectivity are then analyzed in terms of belts across the country; the Fold Belt (with the discovered oil and gas fields), the Mobile Belt and the accreted arcs. This model inhibits realistic assessment of prospectivity. It now appears the Mobile Belt formed by Oligocene compression then by Early Miocene extension, related to slab-rollback, that unroofed metamorphic core complexes adjacent to starved half-grabens. The grabens filled in the Middle Miocene and were largely transported intact during the Pliocenemore » arc-collision. Early Miocene reefs and hypothesized starved basin source rocks create a viable play throughout northern New Guinea as in the Salawati Basin. The Pliocene clastic section is locally prospective due to overthrusting and deep burial. Within the Fold Belt, the site and types of oil and gas fields are largely controlled by the basement architecture. This controlled the transfer zones and depocentres during Mesozoic extension and the location of major basement uplifts during compression. In PNG, the Bosavi lineament separates an oil province from a gas province. In Irian Jaya the transition from a relatively competent sequence to a rifted sequence west of {approx}139{degrees}E may also be a gas-oil province boundary. Understanding, in detail, the compartmentalization of inverted blocks and areas of thin-skinned thrusting, controlled by the basement architecture, will help constrain hydrocarbon prospectivity.« less
  • High-grade metamorphic rocks of the Precambrian Nimrod Group (NG) constitute one of few cratonal basement exposures in the Transantarctic Mountains. These rocks represent an outlier of the East Antarctic craton, evolved as part of Gondwana and pre-Gondwana (Rodinia) supercontinents. Despite pervasive, high-strain ductile deformation at T [>=] 650 C, they preserve petrologic and geochronologic evidence of an earlier history. Sm-Nd model ages from several NG lithologies, including that of a [approximately]1.7 Ga orthogneiss, range from about 2.7--2.9 Ga; these ages reflect both sedimentary and magmatic derivation from Archean crust. Individual detrital zircon U-Pb ages (about 1.7--2.6 Ga) from NG quartzitesmore » indicate clastic input from Archean to Paleoproterozoic source terrains. The Sm-Nd and U-Pb ages are reminiscent of both the Yavapai-Mazatzal (1.6--1.8 Ga) and Wyoming (> 2.5 Ga) provinces in western North America. U-Pb ages from syn-tectonic metaigneous and pelitic NG tectonites indicate that this basement complex was re-worked by the major ductile deformation in latest neoproterozoic to Early Cambrian time. Supracrustal assemblages that lie outboard of the Nimrod craton include Neoproterozoic graywacke, impure carbonate, and minor mafic volcanics (Beardmore Group), and Cambrian to Lower Ordovician carbonate and siliciclastic rocks (Byrd Group). Neoproterozoic ([approximately]750 Ma) rifting along the proto-Pacific margin of East Antarctica is reflected by deposition of Beardmore turbidites and coeval mafic magmatism. Latest Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic orogenesis occurred along a left-oblique convergent plate margin of East Antarctica is reflected by deposition of Beardmore turbidites and coeval mafic magmatism.« less