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Title: Energy recovery ventilator

Abstract

An energy recovery ventilator adapted to be mounted on a roof and adapted to be connected to the outlet of an exhaust air duct of a building ventilation system and the inlet of an air supply duct of a building ventilation system. The energy recovery ventilator includes a housing having an exhaust air chamber and a supply air chamber separated by a divider wall. A circular heat transfer wheel is position in the housing, a portion of the wheel being housed in the exhaust air chamber and a second portion of the wheel being housed in the supply air chamber, and the heat transfer wheel is caused to rotate about a central axis. An exhaust fan is housed in the exhaust air chamber and causes exhaust air to be pulled through the exhaust air duct and the heat transfer wheel and to be exhausted from the housing. A supply air fan is housed in the supply air housing above the heat transfer wheel, and causes outside air to be drawn into the supply air chamber and to be forced through the heat transfer wheel into the air supply duct.

Inventors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5237244
Patent Number(s):
US 4513809
Assignee:
Wehr Corporation EDB-85-156156
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Patent File Date: Filed date 3 Jan 1983; Other Information: PAT-APPL-455042
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; BUILDINGS; HEAT RECOVERY; VENTILATION; HEAT RECOVERY EQUIPMENT; DESIGN; VENTILATION SYSTEMS; AIR FLOW; BLOWERS; EXHAUST SYSTEMS; ENERGY RECOVERY; EQUIPMENT; FLUID FLOW; GAS FLOW; RECOVERY; 320100* - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Buildings

Citation Formats

Schneider, S. L., and Dravnieks, K. Energy recovery ventilator. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Schneider, S. L., & Dravnieks, K. Energy recovery ventilator. United States.
Schneider, S. L., and Dravnieks, K. 1985. "Energy recovery ventilator". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5237244,
title = {Energy recovery ventilator},
author = {Schneider, S. L. and Dravnieks, K.},
abstractNote = {An energy recovery ventilator adapted to be mounted on a roof and adapted to be connected to the outlet of an exhaust air duct of a building ventilation system and the inlet of an air supply duct of a building ventilation system. The energy recovery ventilator includes a housing having an exhaust air chamber and a supply air chamber separated by a divider wall. A circular heat transfer wheel is position in the housing, a portion of the wheel being housed in the exhaust air chamber and a second portion of the wheel being housed in the supply air chamber, and the heat transfer wheel is caused to rotate about a central axis. An exhaust fan is housed in the exhaust air chamber and causes exhaust air to be pulled through the exhaust air duct and the heat transfer wheel and to be exhausted from the housing. A supply air fan is housed in the supply air housing above the heat transfer wheel, and causes outside air to be drawn into the supply air chamber and to be forced through the heat transfer wheel into the air supply duct.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1985,
month = 4
}
  • An energy recovery heat exchanger (100) includes a housing (102). The housing has a first flowpath (144) from a first inlet (104) to a first outlet (106). The housing has a second flowpath (146) from a second inlet (108) to a second outlet (110). Either of two cores may be in an operative position in the housing. Each core has a number of first passageways having open first and second ends and closed first and second sides. Each core has a number of second such passageways interspersed with the first passageways. The ends of the second passageways are aligned withmore » the sides of the first passageways and vice versa. A number of heat transfer member sections separate adjacent ones of the first and second passageways. An actuator is coupled to the carrier to shift the cores between first and second conditions. In the first condition, the first core (20) is in the operative position and the second core (220) is not. In the second condition, the second core is in the operative position and the first core is not. When a core is in the operative position, its first passageways are along the first flowpath and the second passageways are along the second flowpath.« less
  • This Final Report covers the Cooperative Program carried out to design and optimize an enhanced flat-plate energy recovery ventilator and integrate it into a packaged unitary (rooftop) air conditioning unit. The project objective was to optimize the design of a flat plate energy recovery ventilator (ERV) core that compares favorably to flat plate air-to-air heat exchanger cores on the market and to cost wise to small enthalpy wheel devices. The benefits of an integrated unit incorporating an enhanced ERV core and a downsized heating/cooling unit were characterized and the design of an integrated unit considering performance and cost was optimized.more » Phase I was to develop and optimize the design of a membrane based heat exchanger core. Phase II was the creation and observation of a system integrated demonstrator unit consisting of the Enhanced Energy Recovery Ventilator (EERV) developed in Phase I coupled to a standard Carrier 50HJ rooftop packaged unitary air conditioning unit. Phase III was the optimization of the system prior to commercialization based on the knowledge gained in Phase II. To assure that the designs chosen have the possibility of meeting cost objectives, a preliminary manufacturability and production cost study was performed by the Center for Automation Technologies at RPI. Phase I also included a preliminary design for the integrated unit to be further developed in Phase II. This was to assure that the physical design of the heat exchanger designed in Phase I would be acceptable for use in Phase II. An extensive modeling program was performed by the Center for Building Performance & Diagnostics of CMU. Using EnergyPlus as the software, a typical office building with multiple system configurations in multiple climatic zones in the US was simulated. The performance of energy recovery technologies in packaged rooftop HVAC equipment was evaluated. The experimental program carried out in Phases II and III consisted of fabricating and testing a demonstrator unit using Carrier Comfort Network (CCN) based controls. Augmenting the control signals, CCN was also used to monitor and record additional performance data that supported modeling and conceptual understanding. The result of the testing showed that the EERV core developed in Phase I recovered energy in the demonstrator unit at the expected levels based on projections. In fact, at near-ARI conditions the core recovered about one ton of cooling enthalpy when operating with a three-ton rooftop packaged unit.« less
  • The invention relates to a spray system to be used on continuous mining machines for providing face ventilation of both respirable dust and methane gas in underground coal mines.
  • The invention relates to a water spray ventilator system mounted on a continuous mining machine to streamline airflow and provide effective face ventilation of both respirable dust and methane in underground coal mines. This system has two side spray nozzles mounted one on each side of the mining machine and six spray nozzles disposed on a manifold mounted to the underside of the machine boom. The six spray nozzles are angularly and laterally oriented on the manifold so as to provide non-overlapping spray patterns along the length of the cutter drum.
  • A ventilator is described for an internal combustion engine, consisting of: a housing; a diaphragm that divides the inside of the housing into a pressure chamber communicating with a crankcase and an atmospheric chamber communicating with the atmosphere; an outlet tube extending vertically in the pressure chamber and communicating with an intake manifold; a valve fixed to the diaphragm and acting to open or close an opening at an upper end of the outlet tube for controlling the quantity of blowby gas introduced into the outlet tube from the pressure chamber; an oil sump located at a lower end ofmore » the outlet tube and having a given capacity; a check valve mounted at the bottom of the oil sump to allow fluid to flow from the sump toward the pressure chamber; and an outlet port formed through the side wall of the outlet tube and protruding radially outwardly, the outlet tube being in communication with the intake manifold via the outlet port.« less