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Title: Taiwan refineries adopt wet-air oxidation to treat spent caustic liquors

Abstract

Wet-air oxidation technology is enabling a petrochemical company in Taiwan to increase production while protecting the environment. This 30-year-old technology has found a new niche at three refineries owned and operated by Chinese Petroleum Corporation to treat spent caustic liquor derived from ethylene production and other sources. Wet-air oxidation destroys sulfides, mercaptans, phenols and other difficult-to-treat pollutants, or converts them to biodegradable constituents. Such highly colored, odorous liquors are not amenable to biological treatment; however, effluent from wet-air oxidation at CPC is water-clear and treated easily by the company's biological wastewater treatment system.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Zimpro Environmental Inc., Rothschild, WI (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5138814
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Hazmat World; (United States); Journal Volume: 7:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; PETROLEUM REFINERIES; WASTE MANAGEMENT; PHENOLS; OXIDATION; SULFIDES; TAIWAN; THIOLS; CHEMICAL WASTES; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; AROMATICS; ASIA; CHALCOGENIDES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CHINA; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; ISLANDS; MANAGEMENT; NONRADIOACTIVE WASTES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC SULFUR COMPOUNDS; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; WASTES 020800* -- Petroleum-- Waste Management

Citation Formats

Ellis, C.E. Taiwan refineries adopt wet-air oxidation to treat spent caustic liquors. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Ellis, C.E. Taiwan refineries adopt wet-air oxidation to treat spent caustic liquors. United States.
Ellis, C.E. 1994. "Taiwan refineries adopt wet-air oxidation to treat spent caustic liquors". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5138814,
title = {Taiwan refineries adopt wet-air oxidation to treat spent caustic liquors},
author = {Ellis, C.E.},
abstractNote = {Wet-air oxidation technology is enabling a petrochemical company in Taiwan to increase production while protecting the environment. This 30-year-old technology has found a new niche at three refineries owned and operated by Chinese Petroleum Corporation to treat spent caustic liquor derived from ethylene production and other sources. Wet-air oxidation destroys sulfides, mercaptans, phenols and other difficult-to-treat pollutants, or converts them to biodegradable constituents. Such highly colored, odorous liquors are not amenable to biological treatment; however, effluent from wet-air oxidation at CPC is water-clear and treated easily by the company's biological wastewater treatment system.},
doi = {},
journal = {Hazmat World; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 7:3,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month = 3
}
  • Shows how the wet air oxidation (WAO) unit at a petrochemical complex in Illinois solved the caustic disposal problem with a payback period of only one year. Explains that the unit treats a process wastewater, spent caustic, which is generated in a scrubber for acid gas removal from a hydrocarbon gas stream. Presents diagram of the WAO operation. Finds that although the equipment was not designed to operate at higher flow rates and lower COD concentrations, inventiveness and operating flexibility inherent to the system have allowed continued successful operation. Reveals that the cotreatment of plant biological sludge with the spentmore » caustic liquor is being evaluated. Points out that if sludge oxidation is successful, 2 difficult waste treatment problems will have been solved in a single process.« less
  • Total sulfur in samples of spent caustic arising from the chemical cleaning of coal has been determined by ion chromatography after oxidation of all sulfur species to sulfate. Oxidation with hydrogen peroxide first under basic conditions and subsequently under strongly acidic conditions was required for quantitative conversion of all sulfur species to sulfate. The effects of pH, sample size, and time of oxidation have been studied. The subsequent determination of sulfate by ion chromatography was straightforward, using well-established procedures. The results for total sulfur were reproducible, and the accuracy, based on total sulfur balance, was good. Previously low material balancesmore » for total sulfur have been corrected by this modified procedure to acceptable values. 9 references, 3 tables.« less
  • Caustic used in the fluid catalytic cracking process will usually have more phenols than most spent caustic. Phenols place an added burden on the job of disposing of the spent caustic. Here is a scheme that has worked satisfactorily for the past three years at Lindsey Oil Refinery Ltd., Killingholm, UK. The system uses acidification, gas stripping, light cycle oil extraction and final deoiling with a coalescer.
  • The authors discuss the recovery and use of lignin and hemicellulose and the recycling of chemicals from spent liquors from soda bagasses pulping. The product sales value of a bagasse pulp mill can also be doubled. Profitability can be improved substantially, and a serious environmental problem can also be solved. These discussions are based on laboratory work and on some industrial trials.