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Title: Inventory of Alabama greenhouse gas emissions and sinks: 1990

Abstract

Greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere have been increasing since the industrial revolution. Worldwide efforts are being made to study anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. This study quantified the anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions in Alabama in 1990. Alabama anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and sinks from 13 sources were studied. 1990 Alabama total anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and sinks were estimated to be 153.42 and 21.66 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. As a result, the net total greenhouse gas emissions were estimated to be 131.76 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. Fossil fuel combustion is the major source of emissions, representing approximately 78 percent. Coal mining and landfills are other two significant emission sources, representing approximately 10 and 6 percent of the total emissions respectively. Forests in Alabama represent the major sink, offsetting approximately 14 percent of the total emissions. On a per capita basis, Alabama`s emission rate is 32.3 tons of carbon dioxide equivalent per capita in 1990, compared to the national per capita average of 23.4 tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. The high emission rate is attributed to higher emissions than the national average from fossil fuel combustion, from coal mining and landfills in Alabama.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
478733
Report Number(s):
CONF-960958-
TRN: 97:002640-0125
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Partnerships to develop and apply biomass technologies, Nashville, TN (United States), 15-19 Sep 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Bioenergy `96: Partnerships to develop and apply biomass technologies. Volume I and II; PB: 1171 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ALABAMA; CARBON SINKS; POLLUTION SOURCES; GREENHOUSE GASES; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING

Citation Formats

Li, Chumeng, Herz, W.J., and Griffin, R.A.. Inventory of Alabama greenhouse gas emissions and sinks: 1990. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Li, Chumeng, Herz, W.J., & Griffin, R.A.. Inventory of Alabama greenhouse gas emissions and sinks: 1990. United States.
Li, Chumeng, Herz, W.J., and Griffin, R.A.. Tue . "Inventory of Alabama greenhouse gas emissions and sinks: 1990". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_478733,
title = {Inventory of Alabama greenhouse gas emissions and sinks: 1990},
author = {Li, Chumeng and Herz, W.J. and Griffin, R.A.},
abstractNote = {Greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere have been increasing since the industrial revolution. Worldwide efforts are being made to study anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. This study quantified the anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions in Alabama in 1990. Alabama anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and sinks from 13 sources were studied. 1990 Alabama total anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and sinks were estimated to be 153.42 and 21.66 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. As a result, the net total greenhouse gas emissions were estimated to be 131.76 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. Fossil fuel combustion is the major source of emissions, representing approximately 78 percent. Coal mining and landfills are other two significant emission sources, representing approximately 10 and 6 percent of the total emissions respectively. Forests in Alabama represent the major sink, offsetting approximately 14 percent of the total emissions. On a per capita basis, Alabama`s emission rate is 32.3 tons of carbon dioxide equivalent per capita in 1990, compared to the national per capita average of 23.4 tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. The high emission rate is attributed to higher emissions than the national average from fossil fuel combustion, from coal mining and landfills in Alabama.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1996},
month = {Tue Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1996}
}

Conference:
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