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Title: Micromachining technology for advanced weapon systems

Abstract

An overview of planned uses for polysilicon surface-micromachining technology in advanced weapon systems is presented. Specifically, this technology may allow consideration of fundamentally new architectures for realization of surety component functions.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
454020
Report Number(s):
SAND-96-1934C; CONF-970329-4
ON: DE97001878
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Government microcircuit applications conference: power electronics - from micro to kilo and beyond, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 10-14 Mar 1997; Other Information: PBD: [1996]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; INTEGRATED CIRCUITS; FABRICATION; EQUIPMENT INTERFACES; MACHINE PARTS; MICROELECTRONICS; SURFACE COATING; SURFACE FINISHING; SURFACE TREATMENTS; SILICON OXIDES; LAYERS; ELECTRIC CONDUCTORS; CONNECTORS; CHEMICAL POLISHING; MECHANICAL POLISHING

Citation Formats

Sniegowski, J.J. Micromachining technology for advanced weapon systems. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Sniegowski, J.J. Micromachining technology for advanced weapon systems. United States.
Sniegowski, J.J. Tue . "Micromachining technology for advanced weapon systems". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/454020.
@article{osti_454020,
title = {Micromachining technology for advanced weapon systems},
author = {Sniegowski, J.J.},
abstractNote = {An overview of planned uses for polysilicon surface-micromachining technology in advanced weapon systems is presented. Specifically, this technology may allow consideration of fundamentally new architectures for realization of surety component functions.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1996},
month = {Tue Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1996}
}

Conference:
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  • The design, fabrication and characterization of a low-voltage rotary stepper motor are presented in this work. Using a five-level polysilicon MEMS technology, steps were taken to increase the capacitance over previous stepper motor designs to generate high torque at low voltages. A low-friction hub was developed to minimize frictional loads due to rubbing surfaces, producing an estimated resistive torque of about 6 pN-m. This design also allowed investigations into the potential benefit of using hard materials such as silicon nitride for lining of both the stationary and rotating hub components. The result is an electrostatic stepper motor capable of operationmore » at less than six volts.« less
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