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Title: Cellulase production from spent sulfite liquor and paper-mill waste fiber

Abstract

Since a high proportion of the overall cost of the conversion of cellulosics to useful products is the expense of cellulose production (1), it is desirable to develop new processes for producing large amounts of cellulase inexpensively. So far, most of the research work on cellulose production has been carried out using milled cellulose powder and inorganic salts as substrates, which significantly increases the cost of enzyme production. In order to reduce the cost of raw materials, we tried to develop from industrial wastes a new medium for the production of cellulose. In this report, we describe a simple method by which an all-waste medium, which was composed of spent ammonium sulfite liquor and cellulosic waste of a paper mill, and a catabolite derepression mutant of Penicillium decumbens were used to produce the enzyme efficiently.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Shandong Univ. (China)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Badger Engineers, Inc., Tampa, FL (United States); Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
431594
Report Number(s):
CONF-900512-
TRN: 96:006510-0032
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 12. symposium on biotechnology fuels and chemicals, Gatlinburg, TN (United States), 7-11 May 1990; Other Information: PBD: 1991; Related Information: Is Part Of Twelfth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals; Greenbaum, E. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]; Wyman, C.E. [ed.] [Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (United States)]; PB: 934 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; CELLULASE; BIOSYNTHESIS; CELLULOSE; CONVERSION; SPENT LIQUORS; BIOTECHNOLOGY; COST; INDUSTRIAL WASTES; PENICILLIUM; SUBSTRATES; PAPER INDUSTRY; WASTE MANAGEMENT

Citation Formats

Qu Yinbo, Zhao Xin, Gao Peiji, and Wang Zunong. Cellulase production from spent sulfite liquor and paper-mill waste fiber. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Qu Yinbo, Zhao Xin, Gao Peiji, & Wang Zunong. Cellulase production from spent sulfite liquor and paper-mill waste fiber. United States.
Qu Yinbo, Zhao Xin, Gao Peiji, and Wang Zunong. 1991. "Cellulase production from spent sulfite liquor and paper-mill waste fiber". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_431594,
title = {Cellulase production from spent sulfite liquor and paper-mill waste fiber},
author = {Qu Yinbo and Zhao Xin and Gao Peiji and Wang Zunong},
abstractNote = {Since a high proportion of the overall cost of the conversion of cellulosics to useful products is the expense of cellulose production (1), it is desirable to develop new processes for producing large amounts of cellulase inexpensively. So far, most of the research work on cellulose production has been carried out using milled cellulose powder and inorganic salts as substrates, which significantly increases the cost of enzyme production. In order to reduce the cost of raw materials, we tried to develop from industrial wastes a new medium for the production of cellulose. In this report, we describe a simple method by which an all-waste medium, which was composed of spent ammonium sulfite liquor and cellulosic waste of a paper mill, and a catabolite derepression mutant of Penicillium decumbens were used to produce the enzyme efficiently.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month =
}

Conference:
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  • Some low-yield sulfite pulping operations ferment spent sulfite liquor (SSL) to remove biochemical oxygen demand associated with dissolved sugars while at the same time generating ethanol as a salable product. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of primary clarifier sludge in a medium of SSL was proposed as a means of reducing the amount of sludge to be disposed of while at the same time increasing ethanol productivity. In this article, the option of fortifying existing SSL fermenting processes with the sugars produced via in situ enzymatic hydrolysis of sulfite primary clarifier sludge (PCS) has been explored. In 100% SSL PCSmore » hydrolysis rates as high as 3.4 g/(L{center_dot}h) were observed at an initial enzyme loading of 10 filter paper units (FPU)/g PCS. To reduce the deleterious effects of glucose inhibition, single-stage SSF was carried out using cellulose enzymes and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The production rate of ethanol in SSL was increased by as much as 25% through the SSF process. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.« less
  • To reduce the BOD of spent sulfite liquor before disposal, torula yeast (Candida utilis) is produced by a continuous culture process, the productivity of which is limited by sugar concentration and cell growth rate. To increase productivity, a recycle system has been designed and tested. Cells were sedimented continuously with a flocculating agent (bentonite) before being recycled to the fermentor. A bentonite concentration of 0.02 g/g cell was required. A computer monitoring system based on material balancing techniques was developed to monitor and control the recycle system. With this computer system, productivity was raised to 6.1 g/L-h, with cell concentrationsmore » of less than or equal to 65 g/L in the recycle stream and 24 g/L in the fermentor. This represents a productivity increase of 150% over continuous culture with no recycle.« less
  • During and a few years after the Second World War, an important chemical industry was built up in Sweden based on wood as raw material together with sodium chloride and electric power. An astonishingly large variety of simple chemical products was produced, many of them vital to the Swedish society. The main intermediary product was ethanol obtained from sulfite waste liquor through fermentation. Glycol products were made via ethylene and ethylene oxide. Oxidation to acetaldehyde, followed by aldol condensation, and to acetic acid gave products such as butanol, butyl acetate and octanol. The manufacture of a cellulose ether, ethyl-hydroxyethyl cellulosemore » provides a good example of a well integrated system. (auth)« less
  • Although lignocellulosic biomass and wastes are targeted as an attractive alternative fermentation feedstock for the production of fuel ethanol, cellulosic ethanol is not yet an industrial reality because of problems in bioconversion technologies relating both to depolymerization and fermentation. In the production of wood pulp by the sulfite process, about 50% of the wood (hemicellulose and lignin) is dissolved to produce cellulose pulp, and the pulp mill effluent ([open quotes]spent sulfite liquor[close quotes] SSL) represents the only lignocellulosic hydrolysate available today in large quantities. Although softwoods have been the traditional feedstock for pulping operations, hardwood pulping is becoming more popular,more » and the pentose sugars in hardwood SSL (principally xylose) are not fermented by the yeasts currently being used in the production of ethanol from softwood SSL. This study assessed the fermentation performance characteristics of a patented (US Pat. 5,000,000), recombinant Escherichia coli B (ATCC 11303 pLOI297) in anaerobic batch fermentations of both nutrient-supplemented soft and hardwood SSL (30-35 g/L total reducing sugars). The pH was controlled at 7.0 to maximize tolerance to acetic acid. In contrast to the high-performance characteristics exhibited in synthetic media, formulated to mimic the composition of softwood and hardwood SSL, performance in SSL media was variable with conversion efficiencies in the range of 67-84% for hardwood SSL and 53-76% for softwood SSL. Overlimiting treatment of HSSL, using Ca(OH)[sub 2], improved overall volumetric productivity two- to sevenfold to a max of 0.42 g/L/h at an initial cell loading of 0.5 g dry wt/L. A conversion efficiency of 92% was achieved using diluted Ca(OH)[sub 2]-treated hardwood SSL. The variable behavior of this particular genetic construct is viewed as a major detractant regarding its candidacy as a biocatalyst for SSL fermentations. 48 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.« less
  • Segregated waste-paper products could be an ideal feed material for biological conversion to sugars with the possibility of subsequent conversion to ethanol. The approach in this scientific note represents an alternative to simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). The idea is to optimize the enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentating steps separately. For waste-paper hydrolysis, our approach is to provide an attriting force that constantly creates fresh surface area for enzymatic attack. This is accomplished by using an external centrifugal pump that provides a constant shearing of the wastepaper to create solid-liquid surface area. Another important aspect of this study is the productionmore » of cellulase systems by bacteria. The overall intent is to be able to produce low-cost cellulase sources, and then use them in reactors that provide for the most efficient interaction between enzyme and solid substrate. This article describes preliminary findings for the use of a bacterial cellulase in an attrition bioreactor for the purpose of enhancing the hydrolysis of cellulose in waste paper.« less