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Title: Boston Edison and LG&E win 7th annual substation design contest

Abstract

Boston`s Edison`s Network Station 53 won First Place in the engineering/operations category of Electric Light & Power`s 7th annual substation design contest. Station 53 also took Second Place in the aesthetic design category. Boston Edison is no stranger to the contest, having won top honors in the aesthetic category in the very first contest in 1990. That same year, Boston took Second Place in engineering/operations design and Third Place in aesthetic design. Station 53 occupies a 12,074-square-foot site in the heart of the Boston financial district. It replaces an existing station where the land was required for Boston`s Central Artery project. Great care was taken to ensure that Station 53 would blend into the cityscape and be pleasing to the eye. The architectural treatment was designed by the Boston Anderson-Nichols & Company Inc., in cooperation with the Boston Redevelopment Authority. The latest in engineering technology was utilized to guarantee reliability, maintain the highest service quality and provide capacity for future load growth in the downtown area. Station 53 is supplied by two underground 115-kV pipe-type transmission cables. Unattended and remotely operated, Station 53 has the capability of sectionalizing the 115-kV power supply by remote control to isolate the faulted sections.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
401822
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Electric Light and Power; Journal Volume: 74; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: PBD: Jul 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; POWER SUBSTATIONS; DESIGN; REMOTE CONTROL

Citation Formats

Beaty, W. Boston Edison and LG&E win 7th annual substation design contest. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Beaty, W. Boston Edison and LG&E win 7th annual substation design contest. United States.
Beaty, W. 1996. "Boston Edison and LG&E win 7th annual substation design contest". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_401822,
title = {Boston Edison and LG&E win 7th annual substation design contest},
author = {Beaty, W.},
abstractNote = {Boston`s Edison`s Network Station 53 won First Place in the engineering/operations category of Electric Light & Power`s 7th annual substation design contest. Station 53 also took Second Place in the aesthetic design category. Boston Edison is no stranger to the contest, having won top honors in the aesthetic category in the very first contest in 1990. That same year, Boston took Second Place in engineering/operations design and Third Place in aesthetic design. Station 53 occupies a 12,074-square-foot site in the heart of the Boston financial district. It replaces an existing station where the land was required for Boston`s Central Artery project. Great care was taken to ensure that Station 53 would blend into the cityscape and be pleasing to the eye. The architectural treatment was designed by the Boston Anderson-Nichols & Company Inc., in cooperation with the Boston Redevelopment Authority. The latest in engineering technology was utilized to guarantee reliability, maintain the highest service quality and provide capacity for future load growth in the downtown area. Station 53 is supplied by two underground 115-kV pipe-type transmission cables. Unattended and remotely operated, Station 53 has the capability of sectionalizing the 115-kV power supply by remote control to isolate the faulted sections.},
doi = {},
journal = {Electric Light and Power},
number = 7,
volume = 74,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 7
}
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