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Title: Developmental arrest in grass shrimp embryos exposed to selected toxicants

Abstract

Excised embryos of the grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) were exposed to single pulse concentrations of selected pollutants for 4 days. The following toxicity endpoints were monitored: rate of embryonic development, embryo mortality, and types of embryo malformation. Each endpoint exhibited concentration--response relationships which were modified by the embryonic age at which exposure commenced. Developmental retardation of up to 3 days was effected by phenol at 0.01% (V/V) and complete developmental arrest occurred at 0.05% and 0.1% (V/V). Similarly for methylene chloride, developmental retardation of 1003 days were observed at 0.1% (V/V) depending on the age of the embryos at the start of the tests. The morphological abnormalities of the embryos are described. The ecological significance of these findings and implications for the development of short-term toxicity tests using grass shrimp embryos are discussed.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Morgan State Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Biology
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
320943
Report Number(s):
CONF-9704249-
Journal ID: ISSN 1071-720X; TRN: IM9910%%133
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 7. symposium on toxicology and risk assessment: ultraviolet radiation and the environment, St. Louis, MO (United States), 7-9 Apr 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1998; Related Information: Is Part Of Environmental toxicology and risk assessment: Seventh volume; Little, E.E.; DeLonay, A.J. [eds.] [Geological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States)]; Greenberg, B.M. [ed.] [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Biology]; PB: 427 p.; ASTM special technical publication, Volume 1333
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; WATER POLLUTION; BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS; SHRIMP; PHENOL; CHROMIUM; METHYLENE CHLORIDE; EMBRYOS; BIOASSAY; CELL DIFFERENTIATION; MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES

Citation Formats

Wilson, J.E.H. Developmental arrest in grass shrimp embryos exposed to selected toxicants. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Wilson, J.E.H. Developmental arrest in grass shrimp embryos exposed to selected toxicants. United States.
Wilson, J.E.H. 1998. "Developmental arrest in grass shrimp embryos exposed to selected toxicants". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_320943,
title = {Developmental arrest in grass shrimp embryos exposed to selected toxicants},
author = {Wilson, J.E.H.},
abstractNote = {Excised embryos of the grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) were exposed to single pulse concentrations of selected pollutants for 4 days. The following toxicity endpoints were monitored: rate of embryonic development, embryo mortality, and types of embryo malformation. Each endpoint exhibited concentration--response relationships which were modified by the embryonic age at which exposure commenced. Developmental retardation of up to 3 days was effected by phenol at 0.01% (V/V) and complete developmental arrest occurred at 0.05% and 0.1% (V/V). Similarly for methylene chloride, developmental retardation of 1003 days were observed at 0.1% (V/V) depending on the age of the embryos at the start of the tests. The morphological abnormalities of the embryos are described. The ecological significance of these findings and implications for the development of short-term toxicity tests using grass shrimp embryos are discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1998,
month =
}

Conference:
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  • The embryos of the grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) have shown sensitivity to the water-soluble fraction of Number 2 fuel oil which indicates this test may be ideal for use as an estuarine developmental toxicity test. Many chemicals that require testing of this nature are insoluble in water. To determine the possible use of carrier solvents in the grass shrimp bioassays, detailed concentration-response curves for each solvent were performed using two test methods. LC50 values for each method were obtained. The first test was a 4-day assay that included the time of hatch, a critical life stage of these embryos. Themore » second test was a 12-d assay which included development from tissue cap stage embryos through 2 days post hatch. The average 4-day LC50s for ETOH, DMSO and acetone were 12.07, 22.57, and 6.80 g/L, respectively. The average 12-day LC50s for ETOH, DMSO and Acetone were 3.63, 12.33 and 6.94 g/L, respectively. The coefficients of variation of each test were always less than 25.2%. Eye malformations were observed with embryos exposed to ETOH, while embryos exposed to DMSO and acetone showed very little embryo malformation. One experiment showed abnormal development of the last abdominal segment. Based on the concentration-response curves, the maximum allowable limit of ETOH, DMSO and acetone to be used as a carrier should be 1, 6, and 4 g/L, respectively.« less
  • Embryos of estuarine grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio have demonstrated sensitivity to various solvents and petroleum products, indicating utility for evaluating estuarine contamination. Testing was performed to establish concentration-response curves for methylene chloride, copper chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide, three known teratogenic chemicals. Two exposure periods were used, 4 d and 12 d, and both periods extended through hatching. The average 4-d LC50 values for methylene chloride, copper chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide were 0.071% v/v, 1.82 mg/L, and 0.21 mg/ml, respectively. The average 12-d LC50 values for methylene chloride, copper chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide were 0.031% v/v, 1.44 mg/L, and 0.057 mg/ml, respectively. Eye malformationsmore » were observed with embryos exposed to concentrations greater than 3 mg/L copper chloride or greater than 0.07% v/v methylene chloride. Very few abnormalities were observed in embryos exposed to 6-aminonicotinamide. Abnormal larval development was found with exposure to copper chloride at concentrations greater than 1 mg/L. The sensitivity and low variability found here further supports the development of these relatively simple methods using grass shrimp embryos. Establishment of sublethal developmental endpoints warrants further investigation because of their potential correspondence to mechanisms of toxic action.« less
  • A test has been developed to determine the toxicity of oil, commercial oil dispersants, and oil biodegradation products to embryos of the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio. The system has several advantages over traditional toxicity tests: Embryos are exposed separately in glass tubes eliminating interaction between individuals, they do not require feeding, are easily examined, and require low volumes of test toxicant. Additionally, tests can be performed using artificial sea salts and adult P. pugio can be maintained and cultured year round in the laboratory. Toxicity tests demonstrated that oil dispersants increased the toxicity of the water-soluble fraction of No. 2more » Fuel Oil with estimated LC50 values approximating those obtained with the 7d chronic tests using Mysidopsis bahia. Embryos exposed to neutral fractions derived by microbial degradation of weathered Prudhoe Bay crude oil showed toxicity of metabolic products at relatively low concentrations and cause virtually 100% mortality within a narrow time interval. P. pugio embryos were especially responsive to oil metabolites, exhibiting high sensitivity and low variability. All tests showed a consistently high survival (90--100%) of control embryos to hatch under a variety of temperatures and salinities; embryos at any given test condition usually hatched within 24h of one another.« less
  • The embryos of the grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) have shown sensitivity to the water soluble fraction of number 2 fuel oil (WSF{sub oil}). To determine the repeatability and versatility of the grass shrimp in bioassays, detailed concentration-response curves were performed using altered test methods. These alterations were to make the test system easier to use, require less volume of toxic material and to shorten the time of the assay. LC50 values for each method were obtained. The methods evaluated the differences between altering time of exposure from 12 to 4 days. The 4-day assay in 24-well plastic plates included themore » time of hatch, a critical life stage of these embryos. The average 12-day LC50 in the glass Leighton tubes was 11.8% VN WSF{sub oil}. The coefficient of variation of the individual test methods were approximately 25%, showing that the repeatability was reasonable for bioassays. These results show that a 4-day assay is practical for screening for the detection of number 2 fuel oil contamination. However, the 12-day assay may be necessary for detection of developmental abnormalities.« less
  • A simple test, using embryos of the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio, was employed to determine the toxicity of two commercial oil dispersants (Corexit 7664 and Corexit 9527) and toxicity of the water soluble fraction of Number 2 fuel oil (WSF oil) prepared with and without the addition of the dispersants. Tests revealed P. pugio embryos were similar to previously measured life stages in their sensitivity to WSF oil prepared without dispersants. They were approximately ten times more sensitive to water soluble fractions of dispersed oil, which may have been due to the approximately ten-fold increases in total hydrocarbons measured analytically.more » Both temperatures and salinity of the sea water affected toxicity of WSF prepared with dispersants, the most obvious effect being earlier onset of mortalities at higher temperatures. (Copyright (c) 1993 Pergamon Press Ltd.)« less