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Title: The mouse homolog of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) gene is highly conserved and maps near the scurfy (sf) mutation on the X chromosome

Abstract

The mouse WASP gene, the homolog of the gene mutation in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, has been isolated and sequenced. The predicted amino acid sequence is 86% identical to human WASP sequence. A distinct feature of the mouse gene is an expanded polymorphic GGA trinucleotide repeat that codes for polyglycine and varies from 15 to 17 triplets in Mus musculus strains. The genomic structure of the mouse gene closely resembles the human with respect to exon-intron positions and intron lengths. The mouse WASP gene is expressed as an {approx}2.4-kb mRNA in thymus and spleen. Chromosomal mapping in an interspecific M. musculus/M. spretus backcross placed in the WASP locus near the centromere of the mouse X chromosome, inseparable form Gata1, Tcfe3, and scurfy (sf). This localization makes WASP a candidate for involvement in scurfy, a T cell-mediated fatal lymphoreticular disease of mice that has previously been proposed as a mouse homolog of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. Northern analysis of sf tissue samples indicated the presence of a consequence of lymphocytic infiltration, but no abnormalities in the amount or size of mRNA present. 34 refs., 5 figs.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States) [and others
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
258287
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Genomics; Journal Volume: 29; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: PBD: 20 Sep 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; GENES; GENETIC MAPPING; DNA SEQUENCING; STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS; MICE; HYBRIDIZATION; HEREDITARY DISEASES; IMMUNE SYSTEM DISEASES; X CHROMOSOME; PROTEINS; AMINO ACID SEQUENCE; NUCLEOTIDES; EXONS; INTRONS; PROBES; POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

Citation Formats

Derry, J.M.J., Wiedemann, P., Wang, Y., Kerns, J.A., Lemahieu, V., and Francke, U. The mouse homolog of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) gene is highly conserved and maps near the scurfy (sf) mutation on the X chromosome. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.1006/geno.1995.9979.
Derry, J.M.J., Wiedemann, P., Wang, Y., Kerns, J.A., Lemahieu, V., & Francke, U. The mouse homolog of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) gene is highly conserved and maps near the scurfy (sf) mutation on the X chromosome. United States. doi:10.1006/geno.1995.9979.
Derry, J.M.J., Wiedemann, P., Wang, Y., Kerns, J.A., Lemahieu, V., and Francke, U. 1995. "The mouse homolog of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) gene is highly conserved and maps near the scurfy (sf) mutation on the X chromosome". United States. doi:10.1006/geno.1995.9979.
@article{osti_258287,
title = {The mouse homolog of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) gene is highly conserved and maps near the scurfy (sf) mutation on the X chromosome},
author = {Derry, J.M.J. and Wiedemann, P. and Wang, Y. and Kerns, J.A. and Lemahieu, V. and Francke, U.},
abstractNote = {The mouse WASP gene, the homolog of the gene mutation in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, has been isolated and sequenced. The predicted amino acid sequence is 86% identical to human WASP sequence. A distinct feature of the mouse gene is an expanded polymorphic GGA trinucleotide repeat that codes for polyglycine and varies from 15 to 17 triplets in Mus musculus strains. The genomic structure of the mouse gene closely resembles the human with respect to exon-intron positions and intron lengths. The mouse WASP gene is expressed as an {approx}2.4-kb mRNA in thymus and spleen. Chromosomal mapping in an interspecific M. musculus/M. spretus backcross placed in the WASP locus near the centromere of the mouse X chromosome, inseparable form Gata1, Tcfe3, and scurfy (sf). This localization makes WASP a candidate for involvement in scurfy, a T cell-mediated fatal lymphoreticular disease of mice that has previously been proposed as a mouse homolog of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. Northern analysis of sf tissue samples indicated the presence of a consequence of lymphocytic infiltration, but no abnormalities in the amount or size of mRNA present. 34 refs., 5 figs.},
doi = {10.1006/geno.1995.9979},
journal = {Genomics},
number = 2,
volume = 29,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month = 9
}
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