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Title: Coronary artery analysis: Computer-assisted selection of best-quality segments in multiple-phase coronary CT angiography

Abstract

Purpose: The authors are developing an automated method to identify the best-quality coronary arterial segment from multiple-phase coronary CT angiography (cCTA) acquisitions, which may be used by either interpreting physicians or computer-aided detection systems to optimally and efficiently utilize the diagnostic information available in multiple-phase cCTA for the detection of coronary artery disease. Methods: After initialization with a manually identified seed point, each coronary artery tree is automatically extracted from multiple cCTA phases using our multiscale coronary artery response enhancement and 3D rolling balloon region growing vessel segmentation and tracking method. The coronary artery trees from multiple phases are then aligned by a global registration using an affine transformation with quadratic terms and nonlinear simplex optimization, followed by a local registration using a cubic B-spline method with fast localized optimization. The corresponding coronary arteries among the available phases are identified using a recursive coronary segment matching method. Each of the identified vessel segments is transformed by the curved planar reformation (CPR) method. Four features are extracted from each corresponding segment as quality indicators in the original computed tomography volume and the straightened CPR volume, and each quality indicator is used as a voting classifier for the arterial segment. A weightedmore » voting ensemble (WVE) classifier is designed to combine the votes of the four voting classifiers for each corresponding segment. The segment with the highest WVE vote is then selected as the best-quality segment. In this study, the training and test sets consisted of 6 and 20 cCTA cases, respectively, each with 6 phases, containing a total of 156 cCTA volumes and 312 coronary artery trees. An observer preference study was also conducted with one expert cardiothoracic radiologist and four nonradiologist readers to visually rank vessel segment quality. The performance of our automated method was evaluated by comparing the automatically identified best-quality segments identified by the computer to those selected by the observers. Results: For the 20 test cases, 254 groups of corresponding vessel segments were identified after multiple phase registration and recursive matching. The AI-BQ segments agreed with the radiologist’s top 2 ranked segments in 78.3% of the 254 groups (Cohen’s kappa 0.60), and with the 4 nonradiologist observers in 76.8%, 84.3%, 83.9%, and 85.8% of the 254 groups. In addition, 89.4% of the AI-BQ segments agreed with at least two observers’ top 2 rankings, and 96.5% agreed with at least one observer’s top 2 rankings. In comparison, agreement between the four observers’ top ranked segment and the radiologist’s top 2 ranked segments were 79.9%, 80.7%, 82.3%, and 76.8%, respectively, with kappa values ranging from 0.56 to 0.68. Conclusions: The performance of our automated method for selecting the best-quality coronary segments from a multiple-phase cCTA acquisition was comparable to the selection made by human observers. This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of the automated method in clinical practice, enabling interpreting physicians to fully utilize the best available information in cCTA for diagnosis of coronary disease, without requiring manual search through the multiple phases and minimizing the variability in image phase selection for evaluation of coronary artery segments across the diversity of human readers with variations in expertise.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22689261
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Medical Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0094-2405
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; COMPUTERS; CORONARIES; FIRST AID; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS

Citation Formats

Zhou, Chuan, E-mail: chuan@umich.edu, and Chan, Heang-. Coronary artery analysis: Computer-assisted selection of best-quality segments in multiple-phase coronary CT angiography. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4961740.
Zhou, Chuan, E-mail: chuan@umich.edu, & Chan, Heang-. Coronary artery analysis: Computer-assisted selection of best-quality segments in multiple-phase coronary CT angiography. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4961740.
Zhou, Chuan, E-mail: chuan@umich.edu, and Chan, Heang-. Sat . "Coronary artery analysis: Computer-assisted selection of best-quality segments in multiple-phase coronary CT angiography". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4961740.
@article{osti_22689261,
title = {Coronary artery analysis: Computer-assisted selection of best-quality segments in multiple-phase coronary CT angiography},
author = {Zhou, Chuan, E-mail: chuan@umich.edu and Chan, Heang-},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The authors are developing an automated method to identify the best-quality coronary arterial segment from multiple-phase coronary CT angiography (cCTA) acquisitions, which may be used by either interpreting physicians or computer-aided detection systems to optimally and efficiently utilize the diagnostic information available in multiple-phase cCTA for the detection of coronary artery disease. Methods: After initialization with a manually identified seed point, each coronary artery tree is automatically extracted from multiple cCTA phases using our multiscale coronary artery response enhancement and 3D rolling balloon region growing vessel segmentation and tracking method. The coronary artery trees from multiple phases are then aligned by a global registration using an affine transformation with quadratic terms and nonlinear simplex optimization, followed by a local registration using a cubic B-spline method with fast localized optimization. The corresponding coronary arteries among the available phases are identified using a recursive coronary segment matching method. Each of the identified vessel segments is transformed by the curved planar reformation (CPR) method. Four features are extracted from each corresponding segment as quality indicators in the original computed tomography volume and the straightened CPR volume, and each quality indicator is used as a voting classifier for the arterial segment. A weighted voting ensemble (WVE) classifier is designed to combine the votes of the four voting classifiers for each corresponding segment. The segment with the highest WVE vote is then selected as the best-quality segment. In this study, the training and test sets consisted of 6 and 20 cCTA cases, respectively, each with 6 phases, containing a total of 156 cCTA volumes and 312 coronary artery trees. An observer preference study was also conducted with one expert cardiothoracic radiologist and four nonradiologist readers to visually rank vessel segment quality. The performance of our automated method was evaluated by comparing the automatically identified best-quality segments identified by the computer to those selected by the observers. Results: For the 20 test cases, 254 groups of corresponding vessel segments were identified after multiple phase registration and recursive matching. The AI-BQ segments agreed with the radiologist’s top 2 ranked segments in 78.3% of the 254 groups (Cohen’s kappa 0.60), and with the 4 nonradiologist observers in 76.8%, 84.3%, 83.9%, and 85.8% of the 254 groups. In addition, 89.4% of the AI-BQ segments agreed with at least two observers’ top 2 rankings, and 96.5% agreed with at least one observer’s top 2 rankings. In comparison, agreement between the four observers’ top ranked segment and the radiologist’s top 2 ranked segments were 79.9%, 80.7%, 82.3%, and 76.8%, respectively, with kappa values ranging from 0.56 to 0.68. Conclusions: The performance of our automated method for selecting the best-quality coronary segments from a multiple-phase cCTA acquisition was comparable to the selection made by human observers. This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of the automated method in clinical practice, enabling interpreting physicians to fully utilize the best available information in cCTA for diagnosis of coronary disease, without requiring manual search through the multiple phases and minimizing the variability in image phase selection for evaluation of coronary artery segments across the diversity of human readers with variations in expertise.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4961740},
journal = {Medical Physics},
issn = {0094-2405},
number = 10,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {10}
}