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Title: SU-F-T-515: Increased Skin Dose in Supine Craniospinal Irradiation Due to Carbon Fiber Couch and Vacuum Bag Immobilization Device

Abstract

Purpose: To measure the surface dose for supine craniospinal irradiation employing posterior beams, treating through an imaging couch and BlueBag immobilization device. Methods: The percentage depth dose (PDD) in the buildup region of a clinical 6 MV photon beam was measured using an Advanced Markus parallel plate ionization chamber in a solid water phantom. The PDD from a 10×10 cm{sup 2} anterior beam was measured at 100 cm SSD, simulating a traditional prone craniospinal technique. The measurements were compared to commissioning and treatment planning system data. The PDD was also measured in a posterior setup with the phantom surface laying directly on the Brainlab carbon fiber imaging couch, with the phantom surface 100 cm from the source, simulating a supine craniospinal setup. The posterior measurements were repeated with a BlueBag vacuum immobilization device between the couch and phantom, with thicknesses of 1.7 cm and 5 cm. The PDD from a 10×10 cm{sup 2} field and a typical 6×30 cm{sup 2} craniospinal field were also compared. The PDDs were normalized at 5 cm to reflect typical craniospinal prescription dose normalization. Results: The measured PDD curve from the anterior setup agreed well with commissioning and treatment planning data, with surface doses ofmore » 19.9%, 28.8% and 27.7%, respectively. The surface doses of the 10×10 cm{sup 2} and 6×30 cm{sup 2} fields delivered through the imaging couch were both 122.4%. The supine setup yielded surface doses of 122.4%, 121.6%, and 119.6% for the couch only, 1.7 cm bag, and 5 cm bag setups, respectively. Conclusion: Delivering craniospinal irradiation through a carbon fiber couch removes the majority of skin sparing. The addition of a vacuum bag immobilization device restores some skin sparing, but the magnitude of this effect is negligible.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649101
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CARBON FIBERS; DEPTH DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; EQUIPMENT; IONIZATION CHAMBERS; IRRADIATION; PHANTOMS; PHOTON BEAMS; SKIN

Citation Formats

Robertson, D, Zhao, Z, Wang, X, and Yang, J. SU-F-T-515: Increased Skin Dose in Supine Craniospinal Irradiation Due to Carbon Fiber Couch and Vacuum Bag Immobilization Device. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956700.
Robertson, D, Zhao, Z, Wang, X, & Yang, J. SU-F-T-515: Increased Skin Dose in Supine Craniospinal Irradiation Due to Carbon Fiber Couch and Vacuum Bag Immobilization Device. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956700.
Robertson, D, Zhao, Z, Wang, X, and Yang, J. 2016. "SU-F-T-515: Increased Skin Dose in Supine Craniospinal Irradiation Due to Carbon Fiber Couch and Vacuum Bag Immobilization Device". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956700.
@article{osti_22649101,
title = {SU-F-T-515: Increased Skin Dose in Supine Craniospinal Irradiation Due to Carbon Fiber Couch and Vacuum Bag Immobilization Device},
author = {Robertson, D and Zhao, Z and Wang, X and Yang, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To measure the surface dose for supine craniospinal irradiation employing posterior beams, treating through an imaging couch and BlueBag immobilization device. Methods: The percentage depth dose (PDD) in the buildup region of a clinical 6 MV photon beam was measured using an Advanced Markus parallel plate ionization chamber in a solid water phantom. The PDD from a 10×10 cm{sup 2} anterior beam was measured at 100 cm SSD, simulating a traditional prone craniospinal technique. The measurements were compared to commissioning and treatment planning system data. The PDD was also measured in a posterior setup with the phantom surface laying directly on the Brainlab carbon fiber imaging couch, with the phantom surface 100 cm from the source, simulating a supine craniospinal setup. The posterior measurements were repeated with a BlueBag vacuum immobilization device between the couch and phantom, with thicknesses of 1.7 cm and 5 cm. The PDD from a 10×10 cm{sup 2} field and a typical 6×30 cm{sup 2} craniospinal field were also compared. The PDDs were normalized at 5 cm to reflect typical craniospinal prescription dose normalization. Results: The measured PDD curve from the anterior setup agreed well with commissioning and treatment planning data, with surface doses of 19.9%, 28.8% and 27.7%, respectively. The surface doses of the 10×10 cm{sup 2} and 6×30 cm{sup 2} fields delivered through the imaging couch were both 122.4%. The supine setup yielded surface doses of 122.4%, 121.6%, and 119.6% for the couch only, 1.7 cm bag, and 5 cm bag setups, respectively. Conclusion: Delivering craniospinal irradiation through a carbon fiber couch removes the majority of skin sparing. The addition of a vacuum bag immobilization device restores some skin sparing, but the magnitude of this effect is negligible.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956700},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • To investigate the unexpected skin dose increase from intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on vacuum cushions and carbon-fiber couches and then to modify the dosimetric plan accordingly. Eleven prostate cancer patients undergoing IMRT were treated in prone position with a vacuum cushion. Two under-couch beams scattered the radiation from the vacuum cushion and carbon-fiber couch. The IMRT plans with both devices contoured were compared with the plans not contouring them. The skin doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) placed on the inguinal regions in a single IMRT fraction. Tissue equivalent thickness was transformed for both devices with the relative densities.more » The TLD-measured skin doses (59.5 {+-} 9.5 cGy and 55.6 {+-} 5.9 cGy at left and right inguinal regions, respectively) were significantly higher than the calculated doses (28.7 {+-} 4.7 cGy; p = 2.2 x 10{sup -5} and 26.2 {+-} 4.3 cGy; p = 1.5 x 10{sup -5}) not contouring the vacuum cushion and carbon-fiber couch. The calculated skin doses with both devices contoured (59.1 {+-} 8.8 cGy and 55.5 {+-} 5.7 cGy) were similar to the TLD-measured doses. In addition, the calculated skin doses using the vacuum cushion and a converted thickness of the simulator couch were no different from the TLD-measured doses. The recalculated doses of rectum and bladder did not change significantly. The dose that covered 95% of target volume was less than the prescribed dose in 4 of 11 patients, and this problem was solved after re-optimization applying the corrected contours. The vacuum cushion and carbon-fiber couch contributed to increased skin doses. The tissue-equivalent-thickness method served as an effective way to correct the dose variations.« less
  • Purpose: To study the effect of the Varian carbon fiber couch top on surface dose for patients being treated using single PA beams in the supine position and to identify simple methods for surface dose reduction. Methods: Measurements of surface dose were obtained in Solid Water phantoms using both a parallel plate ionization chamber (PTW Advanced Markus) and EBT2 Radiochromic films for both 6 and 10MV photons. All measurements were referenced to a depth considered a typical for PA Spine fields. Techniques used to reduce the surface dose included introducing an air standoff using Styrofoam sheets to suspend the phantommore » surface above the couch top and by adding a thin high Z scattering foil on the table surface. Surface doses were evaluated for typical field sizes, standoff heights, and various scattering materials. Comparisons were made to the surface dose obtainable when treating through a Varian Mylar covered tennis racket style couch top. Results: Dependence on typical spine field sizes was relatively minor. Dependence on air gap was much more significant. Surface doses decreased exponentially with increases in air standoff distance. Surface doses were reduced by approximately 50% for an air gap of 10cm and 40% for a 15cm air gap. Surface doses were reduced by an additional 15% by the addition of a 1mm Tin scattering foil. Conclusion: Using simple techniques, it is possible to reduce the surface dose when treating single PA fields through the Varian carbon fiber couch top. Surface doses can be reduced to levels observed when treating though transparent Mylar tops by adding about 15 cm of air gap. Further reductions are possible by adding thin scattering foils, such as Tin or Lead, on the couch surface. This is a low cost approach to reduce surface dose when using the Varian carbon fiber couch top.« less
  • We describe a method of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in the supine position and at a source-skin distance (SSD) of 100 cm for the spinal fields. The procedure is carried out with a 100-cm isocenter linear accelerator and conventional simulator, and the treatment is delivered with 2 opposed lateral cranial fields at source-axis distance (SAD) of 100 cm and 1 or 2 direct posterior spinal fields at SSD, 100 cm. The half beam-blocked cranial fields with a collimator rotation is used to match the superior border of the spinal field at the level of C2 vertebral body. The length of themore » spinal field is fixed, and is the same if 2 spinal fields are used. The position of the isocenter of the spine field is defined by longitudinally moving the couch a distance from the isocenter of the cranial fields and adjusting the SSD = 100 cm to the surface of the couch with the gantry rotated to the angle of 180 Degree-Sign (posteroanterior position), and the distance can be calculated easily according to a few parameters. It only needs a simple calculation without couch rotation, extended SSD, or markers. The inferior and superior borders of the spinal field do not require visualization under fluoroscopy when it is beyond the visual field of the simulator. The entire simulation takes no more than 20 minutes. Supine craniospinal treatment using this technique may substitute the traditional prone position as a potentially beneficial alternative to CSI.« less
  • Purpose: To describe our preliminary experience with supine craniospinal irradiation. The advantages of the supine position for craniospinal irradiation include patient comfort, easier access to maintain an airway for anesthesia, and reduced variability of the head tilt in the face mask. Methods and Materials: The cranial fields were treated with near lateral fields and a table angle to match their divergence to the superior edge of the spinal field. The collimator was rotated to match the divergence from the superior spinal field. The spinal fields were treated using a source to surface distance (SSD) technique with the couch top atmore » 100 cm. When a second spinal field was required, the table and collimator were rotated 90{sup o} to allow for the use of the multileaf collimator and so the gantry could be rotated to match the divergence of the superior spinal field. The multileaf collimator was used for daily dynamic featherings and field-in-field dose control. Results: With a median follow-up of 20.2 months, five documented failures and no cases of radiation myelitis occurred in 23 consecutive patients. No failures occurred in the junctions of the spine-spine or brain-spine fields. Two failures occurred in the primary site alone, two in the spinal axis alone, and one primary site failure plus distant metastasis. The median time to recurrence was 17 months. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that supine approach for delivering craniospinal irradiation is not associated with increased relapses at the field junctions. To date, no cases of radiation myelitis have developed.« less
  • Purpose: To reduce the skin dose from the carbon fiber couch scatter in radiation treatment of breast cancer in the prone position. If this issue is not addressed, the prone breast touching the solid carbon fiber couch can absorb significant dose to the skin and cause the skin reaction. Methods: 1. Use of “tennis racket” instead of the solid couch. To check this hypothesis, we measured the dose at the depth of 5 mm in solid water phantom placed on the couch, using a Farmer chamber. A plan for a patient with 6MV beams, gantry angles of 113 and 286more » degrees Varian scale was used. It was found that treatment with “tennis racket” instead of the solid carbon fiber couch reduces the surface dose by 5–7%, depending on the beam direction. 2. Use of the air gap between the couch and the body was analyzed using radiochromic film on the surface of the solid water phantom 10 cm thick. Initially the phantom was placed on the couch with the film sandwiched in between. Two fields at the angles of 135 and 315 degrees were used. The measurements were repeated for the air gap of 2 and 5 cm and 6 and 15 MV beams. Results: It was found that a 2-cm gap decreased the surface dose by 3% for a 6 MV beam and by 5.5% for a 15 MV beam. A 5-cm gap reduced the dose by 9% for 6 MV and 13.5% for 15 MV. Conclusion: Use of both methods (combined if possible) can significantly reduce the surface dose in radiation therapy of the prone breast and possible skin reaction. We plan to explore dependence of the dose reduction upon the angle of incidence.« less