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Title: Signal pulse emulation for scintillation detectors using Geant4 Monte Carlo with light tracking simulation

Abstract

The anode pulse of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled with a scintillator is used for pulse shape discrimination (PSD) analysis. We have developed a novel emulation technique for the PMT anode pulse based on optical photon transport and a PMT response function. The photon transport was calculated using Geant4 Monte Carlo code and the response function with a BC408 organic scintillator. The obtained percentage RMS value of the difference between the measured and simulated pulse with suitable scintillation properties using GSO:Ce (0.4, 1.0, 1.5 mol%), LaBr{sub 3}:Ce and BGO scintillators were 2.41%, 2.58%, 2.16%, 2.01%, and 3.32%, respectively. The proposed technique demonstrates high reproducibility of the measured pulse and can be applied to simulation studies of various radiation measurements.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-15 Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Sapporo-shi, Hokkaido (Japan)
  2. Graduate School of Health Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-12 Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo-shi, Hokkaido (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22597808
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ANODES; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; G CODES; LANTHANUM BROMIDES; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PHOSPHORS; PHOTOMULTIPLIERS; PHOTON TRANSPORT; PHOTONS; PULSE SHAPERS; PULSES; RESPONSE FUNCTIONS; SCINTILLATION COUNTERS; SCINTILLATIONS; SIGNALS

Citation Formats

Ogawara, R., and Ishikawa, M., E-mail: masayori@med.hokudai.ac.jp. Signal pulse emulation for scintillation detectors using Geant4 Monte Carlo with light tracking simulation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4959186.
Ogawara, R., & Ishikawa, M., E-mail: masayori@med.hokudai.ac.jp. Signal pulse emulation for scintillation detectors using Geant4 Monte Carlo with light tracking simulation. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4959186.
Ogawara, R., and Ishikawa, M., E-mail: masayori@med.hokudai.ac.jp. 2016. "Signal pulse emulation for scintillation detectors using Geant4 Monte Carlo with light tracking simulation". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4959186.
@article{osti_22597808,
title = {Signal pulse emulation for scintillation detectors using Geant4 Monte Carlo with light tracking simulation},
author = {Ogawara, R. and Ishikawa, M., E-mail: masayori@med.hokudai.ac.jp},
abstractNote = {The anode pulse of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled with a scintillator is used for pulse shape discrimination (PSD) analysis. We have developed a novel emulation technique for the PMT anode pulse based on optical photon transport and a PMT response function. The photon transport was calculated using Geant4 Monte Carlo code and the response function with a BC408 organic scintillator. The obtained percentage RMS value of the difference between the measured and simulated pulse with suitable scintillation properties using GSO:Ce (0.4, 1.0, 1.5 mol%), LaBr{sub 3}:Ce and BGO scintillators were 2.41%, 2.58%, 2.16%, 2.01%, and 3.32%, respectively. The proposed technique demonstrates high reproducibility of the measured pulse and can be applied to simulation studies of various radiation measurements.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4959186},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 7,
volume = 87,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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