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Title: Note: Electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface with scanning tunneling microscope

Abstract

We report a novel scanning probe electron energy spectrometer (SPEES) which combines a double toroidal analyzer with a scanning tunneling microscope to achieve both topography imaging and electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface in situ. The spatial resolution of spectroscopy mapping is determined to be better than 0.7 ± 0.2 μm at a tip sample distance of 7 μm. Meanwhile, the size of the field emission electron beam spot on the surface is also measured, and is about 3.6 ± 0.8 μm in diameter. This unambiguously demonstrates that the spatial resolution of SPEES technique can be much better than the size of the incident electron beam.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China and Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22597722
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRON EMISSION; ELECTRONS; FIELD EMISSION; IMAGES; MAPPING; SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; SPECTROMETERS; SPECTROSCOPY; SURFACES; TOPOGRAPHY; TUNNEL EFFECT

Citation Formats

Li, Meng, Xu, Chunkai, E-mail: xuck@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: xjun@ustc.edu.cn, Zhang, Panke, Li, Zhean, and Chen, Xiangjun, E-mail: xuck@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: xjun@ustc.edu.cn. Note: Electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface with scanning tunneling microscope. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4960716.
Li, Meng, Xu, Chunkai, E-mail: xuck@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: xjun@ustc.edu.cn, Zhang, Panke, Li, Zhean, & Chen, Xiangjun, E-mail: xuck@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: xjun@ustc.edu.cn. Note: Electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface with scanning tunneling microscope. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960716.
Li, Meng, Xu, Chunkai, E-mail: xuck@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: xjun@ustc.edu.cn, Zhang, Panke, Li, Zhean, and Chen, Xiangjun, E-mail: xuck@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: xjun@ustc.edu.cn. 2016. "Note: Electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface with scanning tunneling microscope". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960716.
@article{osti_22597722,
title = {Note: Electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface with scanning tunneling microscope},
author = {Li, Meng and Xu, Chunkai, E-mail: xuck@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: xjun@ustc.edu.cn and Zhang, Panke and Li, Zhean and Chen, Xiangjun, E-mail: xuck@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: xjun@ustc.edu.cn},
abstractNote = {We report a novel scanning probe electron energy spectrometer (SPEES) which combines a double toroidal analyzer with a scanning tunneling microscope to achieve both topography imaging and electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface in situ. The spatial resolution of spectroscopy mapping is determined to be better than 0.7 ± 0.2 μm at a tip sample distance of 7 μm. Meanwhile, the size of the field emission electron beam spot on the surface is also measured, and is about 3.6 ± 0.8 μm in diameter. This unambiguously demonstrates that the spatial resolution of SPEES technique can be much better than the size of the incident electron beam.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4960716},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 8,
volume = 87,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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